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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
NBC
Jan 21, 2013 7:00am EST
decided to pull back from threatening to push us over the cliff on the debt ceiling. >> if you do talk to republicans, they'll tell you this is a president, very confident from his re-election. some might use the word cocky, and that he has become more partisan and more hard nosed. would you agree with that sae assessment? >> and is it by necessity or choice? >> no, i think he's become -- he's practical. and if the other side is going to take a position that they're going to oppose you on every initiative, you have to seek national support. in a democracy, people push policy forward not the politicians and so that's a lesson that he has drawn from the first term. that said, as far as i can -- as i know, and as i know him, his door is always open to people who are willing to work together to solve problems and one hopes in the next four years there will be a spirit of cooperation. understand we're never going to agree on anything. that's why we have two parties. in order to move the country forward we have to move together. >> david axelrod, always good to see you. >> good to see you, sava
NBC
Jan 20, 2013 6:00am PST
are can override them. you see it already in his stance on the debt ceiling. the question is whether he will try to overcome that by leading and doing big things that he will campaign for despite opposition by republicans. you know, it's striking. he's willing to throw the long ball on a big sunday for football. when it comes to gun control. will he do it when it comes to medicare reform where he faces a lot of tough opposition. >> we will check back for a preview of "meet the press" coming up in just a little bit. >> thank you. >>> some of the morning's other top stories from jenna wolf on the other side. >> can you ham it? >> i think so. >> can you dig it? thank you for extending your talents this morning, lester. good morning, everyone. we're going to begin with the end of the hostage crisis in nigeria. what happened in the final deadly assault. nbc's annabel roberts has the latest now. >> reporter: the algerian army's final assault brought the four-day siege to an ends but at a price. at least 23 hostages died. the government says this figure will rise. this broadcast on
NBC
Jan 20, 2013 8:00am EST
them you saw it on the fiscal cliff negotiation and you see it already in his stance on the debt ceiling. the question is whether he will try to overcome that by leading and doing big things that he will campaign to are despite opposition by republicans. it is striking. he is willing to throw the long ball on a big sunday for football when it comes to gun control. will he do it when it comes to medicare reform, where he faces a lot of tough opposition? >> david, thanks. we're going to check back with you for a preview of "meet the press" coming up in a little bit. >> thank you >>> we're going to give you some of the morning's other top st e stories from jenna wolfe. >> can you handle it? >> i think so. >> thank you for extending your talents. >>> good morning, everyone. we are going to begin with the end of the hostage crisis in algeria. details are still emerging. annabel roberts has the latest. >> reporter: the algerian army's final assault brought the four-day siege to an end but at a price. at least 23 hostages died. the algerian government says this figure will rise. this vi
NBC
Jan 23, 2013 7:00am PST
house voted to delay a debate over the debt ceiling. chief capitol hill correspondent kelly o'donnell has more. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, natalie. this is to avoid those showdowns we've seen the past two years. it would give the government more time to borrow. while democrats would like a longer term solution, the white house says it would go along. >> most americans believe you don't do your job, you shouldn't get paid. >> reporter: today's vote is a tactical shift in the gop playbook, putting on hold their demand for a debt ceiling increase only with spending cuts attached. >> it's a concession by republicans that they were not going to be able to win a spending cut fight using the debt ceiling vote. >> reporter: the clock is ticking. the country will max out its credit card at $16.4 trillion in several weeks, risking possible default on the nation's debt unless congress okay's more borrowing. the house is considering a short-term fix. lift the debt ceiling for a few months to take the pressure off, but require both house and senate to pass a budget. if they fail, con
NBC
Jan 22, 2013 7:00am PST
debt ceiling deadline until may 19th. elsewhere, earnings reports will likely influence trades today. dupont, johnson & johnson, and ibm all report today. natalie? >> courtney regan at the new tock exchange, thank you. >>> the u.s. education department says it takes more than the standard four years for more than 20% of students to ini finish and get their deemployee mas. they credit the rise in graduation rate for the stiff competition for limited jobs. >>> an analysis of marrs' mclaughlin crater has scientists investigating new evidence that there was water on the red planet. using data from the mars reconnaissance orbiter, it may once have been a lake fed by an underground water supply. the findings are published in "nature geo science" and may push the search for ancient life on mars underground. >>> off-duty police officer in madrid is being credited as a hero this morning after rescuing a woman who fainted and fell on the city's subway tracks. the officer leaped into action and pulled the 52-year-old woman to safety. an oncoming train saw the trouble on the tracks and fortunate
NBC
Jan 17, 2013 7:00am EST
end 2012. this despite concerns about the fiscal cliff and the looming battle over the debt ceiling. back to you. >> mary thompson at the new york stock exchange. thank you. >>> one of television's favorite fathers has died. conrad bain played phillip drummond on "different strokes," the adopted father of two african-american brothers, played by todd bridges and gary coleman a veteran stage actor, bain rose to fame in middle age with the long-.-running family sitcom. conrad bain was 89 years old. a big hit here on nbc. 7:19 now. back to matt, savannah and al. >> must see tv. >> definitely. >> thanks, matt. >> thanks very much. mr. roker is here. >> a big storm is down south. let's go live now to pearl, mississippi, you can see the snow is already on the ground. they have got more on the way. as we take a look and show you what's happening, here is the latest. we have got winter storm warning, winter weather advisories stretching all the way from jackson, mississippi, just into southern new jersey. storm system's a fast mover but it is going to dump a ton snow east. it will dump a lot of r
NBC
Jan 15, 2013 7:00am PST
credit card limit otherwise known as the debt ceiling. mr. obama says he's done with negotiating. >> republicans in congress have two choices here. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. >> reporter: the president deflected a question about whether he would try to raise the debt limit without congress. are you considering a plan b? if not, why not? >> the issue here is whether or not america pays its bills. we are not a deadbeat nation. there are no magic tricks here. >> reporter: the president, though, was pessimistic when it comes to the idea of whether there's going to be a government shutdown. he acknowledged that house republicans may have the votes to do that. that's a fight he's hoping to have separate from the debt limit, matt. the question is whether he can actually make that happen with house republicans. >> chuck todd in washington on this. thanks, as always. >>> natalie morales is over at the news desk with a check of the day's top stories. good morning to you. >> good morning, sa
NBC
Jan 19, 2013 7:00am EST
only use machines that produce a generic body image. >>> house republicans are offering a debt ceiling deal rather than risk a new financial crisis. they will allow new government borrowing for three months, but they insist the senate must pass a budget within those three months. and to add more pressure to get a deal, they promise to withhold paychecks for whichever chamber, house or senate, doesn't pass a budget. >>> officials have issued a high surf advisory for the northern california coast this weekend. the good news -- that's just about perfect for 24 of the world's top surfers who are waxing down their boards for a big wave competition in half moon bay that starts on sunday. the bad news -- the other seven billion people in the world can't swim there. >>> that is the news. guys? back to you guys. >> thank you. >> you're from that area, aren't you -- >> yeah, yeah, no. i wouldn't ever surf. >> you're in the seven billion part. >> we'll be on the beach. >> yeah. >> i used to sit on half moon bay and watch it. exactly. >>> dylan dreyer has another check of the forecast. >>
NBC
Jan 17, 2013 7:00am PST
year end 012, despite concerns about the fiscal cliff and the looming battle over the debt ceiling. >> mary thompson, thank you. >>> one of television's favorite fathers has died. conrad bains played the father on "different strokes." a veteran stage actor, he rose to fame in middle age with the long-running family sitcom. he was 89 years old. a big hit here on nbc. 7:19 right now. back over to matt, savannah and al. >> must-see tv. >> exactly. >>> mr. roker is here. >> a big storm going on down south. live to pearl, mississippi. you can see the snow already on the ground and more on the way. as we take a look and show you what's happening. here is the latest. we have winter storm warnings. winter weather advisories, stretching all the way from jackson, mississippi, to southern new jersey. storm system a fast mover. and a ton of snow. and from the west to the east. it will dump a lot of rain. snowfall amounts, some areas picking up 6 to 12 inches of snow and rainfall to the south of it. anywhere from 3 to 5 inches of rain. that's your latest weather. we'll get your local forecast, right aft
NBC
Jan 23, 2013 4:00am PST
vote would raise the debt ceiling allowing more borrowing through spring to pay america's bills and it cuts pay for lawmakers if they can't pass a budget by tax time april 15th. >> most americans believe you don't do your job you shouldn't get paid. >> i'm tired of government governing by gimmicks. >> reporter: the senate hasn't pass ad budget in almost four years. >> the last time they pass ad budget the ipad hadn't been introduced. >> reporter: paul ryan will draft the budget with deeper cuts. that's a carrot to get conservatives to go along but some still want to see cuts first. >> will not vote to raise the debt ceiling unless significant efforts are made to fix the under lying problems. >> reporter: senate democrats hint theology pass a budget but not soon. >> approach that when we need to. >> reporter: the white house says even in short term the president will sign pinpoint >> the debt ceiling ought not to be a political football. >> reporter: this republican retreat with one last tanned if they can't compromise lawmakers' paychecks could take a hit. what's still not known is if
NBC
Jan 15, 2013 4:00am PST
conference, president obama said he would not negotiate on the debt ceiling although he said he's open to more spending cuts but he insisted the u.s. is, quote, not a dead beat nation. officials in stratford, connecticut, plan to rename an elementary school in honor of victoria soto, a teacher killed in last month's newtown school shooting. officials say she died trying to shield her students from the gunman. >>> walmart will announce a plan to hire every veteran cha wants a job, which could mean 100,000 new jobs. >>> george w.h. bush was released from the hospital after a month. >>> william paul, son of kentucky rand paul, faces charges of assaulting a flight attendant on a january 5th flight. in addition to underage drinking and other charges. >>> the chicago transportation authority is suing united airlines, claiming they are buying its jet fuel 70 miles away to avoid playing close to $300,000 in sales taxes. >>> students at university of vermont should not bring bottled water when they return to campus because the school banned its sale for environmental reasons. they are the largest
NBC
Jan 20, 2013 6:00am EST
increase the debt ceiling on a short-term basis, but the senate has to pass a budget which it has not done in four years and if you don't do that then you don't get pay for congress. that has been criticized by democrats, but the issue here is where house republicans want to fight the administration on spending, and they want to force the president's hand for more spending and they have opportunities to do it, and the debt ceiling is one they don't want to fight over, and it's a bad result politically and economically for the country, and the sequestration, and they can tie some of the efforts to force the president's hand to cut spending to the other fights. >> the gop proposal that just came out calls for the house and senate to have some type of budget by mid april but doesn't include spending cuts, so can we view it as a concession on the republican's side. >> they don't want to get the blame for a potential default and what that would mean for the economy, and they would rather fight on things like shutting the governor down or automatic spending cuts going into effect, and they
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 1:00am EST
so-called debt ceiling -- something most americans hadn't even heard of before two years ago. i want to be clear about this. the debt ceiling is not a question of authorizing more spending. raising the debt ceiling does not authorize more spending. it simply allows the country to pay for spending that congress has already committed to. these are bills that have already been racked up and we need to pay them. so while i'm willing to compromise and find common ground over how to reduce our deficits, america cannot afford another debate with this congress about whether or not they should pay the bills they've already racked up. if congressional republicans refuse to pay america's bills on time, social security checks and veterans' benefits will be delayed. we might not be able to pay our troops, or honor our contracts with small business owners. food inspectors, air traffic controllers, specialists who track down loose nuclear material wouldn't get their paychecks. investors around the world will ask if the united states of america is, in fact, a safe bet. markets could go haywire. inte
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 6:00am EST
as part of the fiscal cliff arrangement, and we have the infamous debt ceiling, which will come into play. so we will be seeing a lot of activity in the next few months, debates about people criticize the government, about the size of the deficit, and it a lot of back and forth over these three issues. without going into all the different ramifications, i want to say one word about the debt ceiling, which is not everybody understands what the debt ceiling is about. the debt ceiling -- raising the debt ceiling, which congress has to do periodically, gives the government the ability to pay its existing bills. it does not create new deficits. it does not create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family which is trying to improve its credit ratings and i know how we can save money, we will not pay our credit card bills. not the most effective way to improve your credit rating. it was a very slow solution to the debt ceiling in august of 2011 that got the u.s. downgraded last time. so it's very important. all these issues are important, but it's very, very imp
NBC
Jan 15, 2013 4:30am PST
renewed calls for congress to raise the debt ceiling. for more on that and a look at the world markets and how they did overnight, we turn to seema mody at cnbc world headquarters. >> good morning to you. let's start with markets. futures lower after a mixed session on monday. as you pointed out apple weighing on tech on reports that it is cutting component costs but dell took others higher on talks it's in talk with several firms. we get a trio of federal reserve officials speaking out about the economy today. the dow rising 18 points in yesterday's trade and nasdaq slipping eight to close at 3117. here's our top story. treasury secretary tim geithner is calling on congress to raise the debt ceiling. in a letter to lawmakers geithner says it could cause harm to the u.s. economy. the government will run out of tools to avoid defaulting on debt sometime in late february or early march. that would mean social security and other government benefit checks would stop going out. fed chairman ben bernanke is joining the cause saying the economy isn't out of the woods just yet from fiscal thre
NBC
Jan 22, 2013 6:00am PST
debt ceiling. in other words, they want to raise the debt cerealing ingce. they say that democrats are going to have to in the senate pass a budget or they won't get paid. it's part of the vote coming up. senate democrats being pressured to deal with the budget in a comprehensive way and not two months at a time although this measure they are voting on for the debt ceiling raising the debt ceiling would really only last until spring. still sort of a piecemeal approach while both sides say they want to do more comprehensive approach similar to what the president laid out but haven't worked out details. >> we'll find out if pressuring their pocketbooks will help out here. the question for you here, why is the vote set for tomorrow and what group do you see most under pressure? >> reporter: they need to deal with this quickly. the treasury department said unless we borrow more money come mid february we won't be able to pay bills. the house has to vote on it. senate has to vote on it. work out kinks and get it to the president's desk before that time and it's coming up in a few weeks. in
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 11:00pm EST
this issue. it will be thought of as a responsible not raise the debt ceiling. in my view, it is changing the way we do business here, starting with the approval of the budget. it is compassionate to spend money, how can it be compassionate that is the next generation. there is no question but what the debt and deficit is a drag on that opportunity. we have a responsibility for american citizens to right this wrong. >> said on the senate budget committee and i can say that the most disappointing part of having served the last two years is a relatively new member, it blows my mind that the senate democrats were not willing to do a budget when you're over $16 trillion in debt. we talked about the ipad that has come into existence during the 40 or so we haven't had a budget. i have a 5-year-old son named jacob. so most of his lifetime we have not had a budget. the failure to prioritize spending. and i think about that, i know it's about him. if we can do a budget for this country and we can't prioritize spending and have a fiscal blueprint, to make sure that we get ourselves on a re
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 11:00pm EST
raising the debt ceiling gives the government the ability to pay its existing bills. it doesn't create new deficit spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family that's trying to improve its credit rating. families that say, i know how we can save money, we won't pay her credit card bills. it was the sole solution to the debt ceiling in august of 2011 in the u.s. downgraded last time. so all these issues are important and it's very important that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where government doesn't pay its bills. >> a number of people have expressed concern about how much of the challenges actually were addressed in a deal, it certainly went part way, but leaves a number of issues still on the table. would you care to raise that as an additional fiscal cliff that is facing us? would you think that it's not as concerning as it was when you raise that term initially? >> as i said the fiscal cliff, if it is allowed to take place, it probably would have traded a recession this year. a good bit of that has been add
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 11:00pm EST
policies. second, you have the debt ceiling. it is a marketing tool the country hostage. we know there's going to be a fighter for the debt ceiling. in the past that feeling with a speed bump that reminded folks who are borrowing too much and needed to make changes. it could be a useful reminder. not because of sars are people really worry about the fate of the u.s. government and its economic damage, which is what we saw last time. the third piece, the fact government spending is going to expire in the triple witching hour of these issues is if this will close and is that going to force action of the hardest pieces still remaining for the fact that they still for all intents and purposes, it's good we didn't go to the fiscal cliff, good release revenue, but we basically did what we always do, which is punted the hard choices and try to declare bipartisan victory. it wasn't there. the question as to make make these next moments were set to getting us to really take on policies. and this is part of your question that will do it the necessary savings the next 10 years, but just as
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 6:00am EST
gregg as they share their thoughts on entitlement reform, the e erasing of the debt ceiling -- the raising of the debt ceiling and sequestration. this is just getting underway. [applause] >> well, good morning. thank you, raymond. and thanks to all of you for making it through the snow drifts. glad you all arrived safely. one flake of snow, and washington closes down. well, we're very excited about the new year. our partnership with the chamber and this morning's program featuring senators kent conrad and judd gregg. before we start our program, i'd like to recognize our sponsors, bdo represented by david trimner. if bdo could, please, stand and be recognized. [applause] all right. the broadmoor remitted by hover -- represented by lori meacham. lori, if you could -- [applause] and ceo update whose editor-in-chief is recovering from a bad case of the flu, so she is not here. bdo is the leader in accounting and consultancy services for associations, the broadmoor is the number one resort property for associations looking for a five-star meeting experience. i've got great memories, i
NBC
Jan 16, 2013 5:00am PST
department is temporarily tapping government workers' retirement funds to avoid hitting the debt ceiling. treasury said the move would give it $156 billion in additional spending capacity and insist that retirees will receive benefits. in a letter to john boehner, treasury secretary tim geithner said the step has been taken before during previous impasses over the debt limit. several republican lawmakers are set to direct treasury to prioritize which bills to pay if congress doesn't raise the debt ceiling. let's get you a check on the markets. futures are lower as we get big earnings this morning from jp morgan and goldman sachs. we have jpmorgan lower whereas goldman sachs is higher. stocks advanced yesterday with the dow extending the winning streak to five days and the s&p 500 hitting a five-year high. we get data out on consumer prices, industrial production and housing. watch out for that. back to you. >> seema, thank you very much. it's 5:17. as you know, facebook yesterday announced the new search. we'll look at what it can do in a bit. >> we look forward to that, thanks. >> 5:17 now. chris
NBC
Jan 23, 2013 5:00am PST
within the hour on raising the debt ceiling. at issue here is whether the federal government should be allowed to borrow more money to pay off its debt. tracie potts is live on capitol hill this morning with all the latest details. good morning. >> good morning, john. two parts of the vote today. first of all, raising the debt ceiling. allowing the country to borrow more to pay off the debt that we have already incurred. something president obama was pushing more. conservative republicans wanted to see cuts first. now the republican leadership said we won't link the two. we'll raise the debt ceiling until the middle of may. however there is a catch. they want to ensure that a budget is in place. a spending plan for the country. so the vote also says if lawmakers on either said don't pass a budget by april 15 -- tax day for everyone else -- they would lose their income. no paychecks until they have a budget. that's where we are now. that's the crux of the vote coming up today. the white house says the president will sign the bill if it's passed. republican ps have been counting their vo
NBC
Jan 15, 2013 5:00am PST
debt ceiling continues to weigh on markets. for that and news before the bell we'll turn to seema mody live at cnbc world headquarters. good morning, seema. >> very good morning to you. let's look at futures. lower right now after a mixed session on monday. apple weighing on tech sector on reports that it is cutting component costs. dell took other pc makers higher on a ride higher on word it is in talks with several private equity firms. we get a trio of federal reserve officials speaking out on the economy. dow rising 18 points in yesterday's trade and nasdaq slipping by eight. in other news, middle class is tightening their belts. among those making between 50 and $100,000 a year spending declined during the holiday season. that comes amid a lackluster outlook in the job market. the magazine says the most troubles for consumers include not being able to afford medical bills or medications or a reduction in health care coverage and missing a payment on a major bill not including a mortgage. consumer reports say americans will be confronted with a smaller paycheck this month. that's t
NBC
Jan 22, 2013 5:00am PST
tomorrow that would allow us to raise the debt ceiling. republicans said they didn't want to do that without cutting back spending. the president didn't want the two linked and republicans apparently have relinquished that threat and pushed for the raising the debt ceiling temporarily into the spring to pay bills. they also say if either chamber doesn't come up with a permanent budget, that chamber, either the house or senate, the lawmakers won't get paid. we'll see how that vote goes later today. the president laid out a number of things including climate change, gay rights, health care immigration, and it remains to be seen how much of that they will be able to tackle in the second term. >> he better eat his wheaties. time to get done. thank you very much. >>> happening now, fire crews are battling to contain a fire at beale air force base about 50 miles north of sacramento. the fire has been burning for hours. this is what it looked like just last night. firefighters say they now have the fire about 75% contained. it broke out about 2:30 yesterday afternoon inside a building on th
NBC
Jan 20, 2013 7:00am PST
us. i'm kris sanchez along with meteorologist rob mayeda. you have forecast the wave conditions for a while. it's kind of exciting to see it come to fruition. >> days out you can see the waves coming out across the pacific. surf advisory through 4:00 today. it's cold again this morning. dry air in place. clear skies. 20s and 30s in the north and east bay valleys this morning. speaking of the coast, we'll see those waves anywhere from 15 to 20 feet for parts of the coast. around pillar point we'll see the energy vaulted up to 30-foot faces, the offshore breezes helping to stand up the waves going into the afternoon. you can see mainly sunny skies heading into the afternoon. our temperatures today, i know it's cold, but just like yesterday, we're going to be getting into the 60s, maybe even close to 70. we'll talk about our next chance of finally seeing rain show up in the forecast. >> we are so looking forward to the warm conditions yesterday when we walked out the door in the morning. we felt that blast of cold air. keeps me at work longer. thank you very much, rob. >>> happening right now, a live look at the white house in washington, d.c., where the president will be sworn into office at 8:55 this morning. president obama will take the oath with his hand on the same bible president lincoln used. it is a momentous occasion, not just for the president, but also for nbc bay area larry gerston who is live in washington, d.c., for the festivities. larry looking very presidential with the back drop behind you, my friend. >> it's hard not to, kris. you get in this room with the capitol behind you, and it's absolutely a fabulous scene. it's very unusual, every four years, this country takes a holiday from politics in washington, and believe me, it's only this weekend. and at this time, people come together, thinking about the future, they're organizing themselves around the presidency and all the things that that institution and office means to this country. this is, by the way, the 57th inauguration. the first was done by president washington in new york, actually. and this is actually the 16th time that a president has been reelected, gone on to a second term. so in that sense, we saw this recently with reagan, h.w. bush, and clinton. but really, it's unusual in that sense, even though we had the few recently happening. with that kind of a back drop, it's going to mean an awful lot to this country to see where this country moves forward over the next four years. >> there's a lot of partying going on. you'll be dressed up in a tux, your wife will be in a gown. >> you bet. >> there's a lot of work ahead as well. where is the talk about the debt ceiling, and the second term options for president obama, or is there no talk about that today? >> today, not so much. but the whole weekend we've been hearing talk about this. congress has decided to ease up a bit, give a three-month extension so we can lift that debt ceiling for the next three months. that will back us into, by the way, the whole idea of sequestration and dealing with the debt crisis on a more firm note in about three months. so they're giving the president, they're giving everyone a little bit of time right now to work it through. i'm sure the president is grateful for that. but for right now, vice president biden, of course, has just taken his oath of office which is very important not only because it's nice to know the vice president's all lined up. but remember, joe biden becomes a very important person to look at over the next four years because there's talk of him running for the presidency four years from now. a lot of that will depend on what hillary clinton does. she's sort of the gorilla in the room right now. but substantively right now, there's not too much going on, only because everyone is involved with the pageantry. lots of streets blocked off. they're expecting about 700,000 people this year. which seems a large number. but down considerably from the 1.8 million that we had just four years ago. so a lot of hustle, a lot of bustle, a lot of excitement and a lot of enthusiasm. >> some folks from the bay area who are there, of course, san francisco mayor ed lee, and also san jose mayor chuck reed. they weren't able to get their watches because the swearing in happens op the same day as the niners are trying to win the nfc championship. where are you going to watch the game, lar sni. >> there's a pretty good constituency, if you will, from the bay area here, largely because of the conference. and there's going to be a bunch of people from the bay area. ed lee hosting a party at the tavern a few blocks from here. a lot of politicos and folks from the bay area will be migrating over there this afternoon about 3:00 washington time. we're going to try to squeeze in there and see what's going on. >> you'll be a party crasher, that's awesome. when you are there, or anywhere, make sure you take pictures so we can post them on our facebook page. >> we are, kris. we've been tweeting them, too. we'll continue to do so. so all those tweeters out there will have some fun. >> we want to see you in a tux. >> okay. >> thanks, larry. >>> the coverage of the inauguration continues. nbc's traci potts has more on what is president obama's second term. >> reporter: four years after making history, this morning president obama takes the oath of office again, in a small ceremony at the white house. he's been talking about what this day means, online with the inaugural committee. >> the inauguration reminds us of the role that we have as fellow citizens in promoting it. >> reporter: he talks to children at a washington school where the first family picked up paint brushes as part of saturday's national day of service. >> it's a symbol of how our democracy works and how we peacefully transfer power. but it should also be an affirmation that we're all in this together. >> reporter: the bidens packed care packages for soldiers saturday. his swearing-in early this morning at the naval observatory. tomorrow, the big public ceremony at the u.s. capitol. stands are built, new grass planted on the mall, security is tight. washington's expecting more than half a million people. >> we're excited that as many americans as possible will be a part of this. >> reporter: it's a much smaller crowd than four years ago, but no less enthusiastic. this group's bringing six bus loads from texas. >> let the president know we support him and the things he's trying to do for this country. >> reporter: tomorrow the celebration, today the ceremony, welcoming back america's president. traci potts, nbc news, washington. >> we'll have extensive coverage of today and tomorrow's inauguration events on air and online. go to nbcbayarea.com for live streaming video as well as photo galleries. and we will have another live report from larry gerston coming up later in this newscast. >>> happening now, tens of thousands of people are on their way, or already in half moon bay for the world's best surfers in action. we're looking live right now at a bit of a quiet start at pillar point this morning. the first heat of the maverick's invitational surf contest is set to start in just about an hour off the coast of half moon bay. there will be monster waves as organizers were hoping for. that's for the pros, though. but the same high surf conditions created trouble for amateurs at a number of beaches yesterday. the coast guard rescued several surfers who got caught in powerful rip currents at both ocean beach in san francisco and dillon beach in ma rib. thankfully, no one was hurt. the high surf is expected to continue at bay area beaches today. we could see waves up to 30 feet. >> the surfers are going to have challenging conditions out there because of the long period in the offshore winds. winds are going to stand up really tall. and then throw out really quick. it's going to be a challenge for the guys. >> the coast guard is warning all beachgoers to be cautious of the water. >>> coming up later in this newscast, we'll tell you why some big-name surfers won't compete today and why. >>> still ahead on "today in the bay," the investigation into an alleged sexual assault against a 49ers player continues this morning. we'll tell you what michael crabtree's lawyer has to say about the accusations. >>> new details this morning in the deadly shooting that shut down the b.a.r.t. station in san leandro for seven hours yesterday. the search is now on for as many as seven suspects in the shooting, and police say the man killed was simply in the wrong place at the wrong time. b.a.r.t. police say two groups of people started shooting at each other at the bus stop area of the station yesterday afternoon. they say that the victim was an african-american man in his 40s. he was an innocent bystander caught in that cross fire. a woman also caught in the cross fire grazed by a bullet. a 16-year-old suspect was arrested yesterday, but police say several others took off moments after the shooting. >> one group was seen running in a certain direction, the other group seen running in the opposite direction. it was a pretty widespread crime scene. >> the b.a.r.t. station was shut down for seven hours. investigators found evidence in some homes nearby. >>> much more ahead on "today in the bay." coming up, amazing video out of hawaii where tourists got way more than they bargained for. a close encounter of the 40-foot kind. >>> pretty pictures outside our window this morning. this time from san jose. clear skies, chely start to the morning. but almost spring-like temperatures later on this afternoon. >>> it is a quarter after 7:00 right now. the sky is pink over san francisco, but all of the city landmarks were lit up in red and gold in anticipation of today's nfc championship game. for that game, 49ers star wide receiver michael crabtree is expected to take the field for that game against the atlanta falcons. however, he will have some distraction. there is an ongoing investigation into an alleged sexual assault. crabtree voluntarily met with san francisco police on friday before boarding the team's afternoon flight to atlanta. police say the allegation involves crabtree inside a san francisco hotel last sunday morning, after the 49ers beat the packers. crabtree was not detained nor arrested. his lawyer releasing this statement says, quote, michael fully cooperated with the inspectors and will continue to do so throughout the investigation. out of respect and integrity for the process, we have no further comment at this time. nbc bay area legal analyst steven clark said the allegations against crabtree can carry serious penalties, but he does not believe the district attorney will rush this case. >> they're going to want to look at all of the information available. was there any witnesses that saw any event that night, or saw michael crabtree with this woman that night. is there any evidence of excessive drinking. and also obviously, is there forensic evidence. they will look at that depending on the nature of this allegation. >> clark says he's not surprised crabtree was allowed to travel to play this weekend. he said crabtree isn't a flight risk, and law enforcement would not want to rush to judgment in a case where the allegations are so serious. >>> a group of tourists in hawaii could not believe their luck when they got up close and personal with not one, but two hump back whales earlier this month. the whales brushed up against the inflatable boat several times and several said the whale seemed to be using the boat to crash her back. the amazed tourists said the whales stayed about ten minutes then disappeared. that sounds nice and calm but i bet they were not that calm when it happened. >>> rob mayeda has a forecast. >> it's a little small to see something that big come underneath. as you step outside this morning, it's looking pretty outside. clear skies, but it is also pretty cold again. 20s and 30s, clear, dry air. no clouds out there. so temperatures bottomed out again. 31 right now in livermore. san jose, also chilly. 36 degrees. 29 in santa rosa. and low 30s in napa. winds slightly offshore. speaking of the winds, let's take you out to half moon bay right now. water temperatures 52 degrees. offshore swell about eight feet. that has been going up and down long periods. as that energy slows down as it approaches the coastline, waves rise up. you'll see the breakers really getting up there, 15, 20 feet, higher sets around pillar point. temperatures will be nice. once we lose the chill of the morning. 60s, maybe near 70 on the coast. dry weather will wrap up the weekend and likely be around for the first half of the week ahead. right now satellite view shows clear skies and storms that are trying to reach the west coast, are hitting the brakes. high pressure is acting like a wall, setting the storm track way off to the north. this dry pattern will hold at least through tuesday. maybe we'll have some showers to the north bay on wednesday. this pattern will get out of here by late friday and saturday, that's when the next best chance of rain comes in next weekend. today mostly sunny skies. patches of fog inland. you can see nothing but sunshine, light offshore breeze, well into the 60s again. despite the chilly start, you should start to see the numbers jumping 30 degrees. 66 in san jose by the afternoon. low 70s possible around santa cruz this afternoon. cooler in fairfield. low 60s there. mid-60s through santa rosa. 65 degrees. look at that out op the coast. the offshore breezes make the coast warmer than the inland valleys. upper 60s around pacifica and half moon bay. surf starts to come down tomorrow. tuesday, temperatures cooling off a bit. we'll get a few extra clouds. wednesday, i think we'll cool off a little bit more. showers mainly north of so noma county. finally, a chance of seeing rain and cooler temperatures next weekend. enjoy the sunshine today. but use a lot of caution out on the beaches. leave it maybe to the professional thrill seekers out there at maverick's to get the waves. >> even if you're walking along the coastline. >> stlutly. >> waves can sneak up on you. >>> still ahead on "today in the bay," keeping memories alive. meet the man at the center to protect the pieces of our collective past. his story will make you bay area proud. >>> an ma who's lived in the bay area for less than a decade probably knows more about the bay area in the '50s, '60s, and '70s, because he has seen it and heard it. now he wants to share it with everyone. tod"today in the bay's" garvin thomas has the story that will make you proud. >> reporter: on the campus of san francisco state university, inside their state of the art library, is something obsolete that keeps alex busy. thousands upon thousands of rolls of film, news film, recorded by bay area television stations from the '50s through the '70s. 4,000 hours of bay area history captured at 24 frames a second. >> this film was shot in 1969. i will be the first person very probably to have looked at this film since 1969. >> reporter: the footage housed at the san francisco bay area television archives has been rescued in a way. you see, before recording on video, and later digitally, television news was captured, edited and broadcast on film. that film went from unused to unwatched to unwanted. much of it, perhaps most of it, was just thrown away. >> i went into an archive, and a bunch of film had just been thrown away, because the film was restricting people's access to get to pallets of toilet paper. >> reporter: the archives is dedicated to not just saving the physical film, but uncovering and sharing its secrets. the first challenge for alex is figuring out what's on it, labels, if they existed, all are often generic, or flat-out wrong. >> there's one that said old mountain. it could be really cool or really serious. >> reporter: once alex decided what to work with, each reel is cleaned, repaired, and digitized. >> it's a different type of history. it's a history you can take a part in. >> reporter: the process, though, can be painstaking and slow. over the years, alex has made it through roughly 200 hours of film or just 5% of the archives. still, he's uncovered treasures of bay area history. >> you know you're lying. >> reporter: harvey milk debating. dianne feinstein debating. there's even woody allen and mohammed ali being themselves. and the '60s being -- well, the '60s. >> there are many more waiting to be discovered. it's like opening pandora's box. until you show people what are in the collection, they aren't going to be able to connect with it and respond to it. >> that was garvin thomas reporting. if you would like to take a peek at some of that old footage, go online to san francisco bay area television archives. >>> next on "today in the bay," we're just about a half hour from the start of the maverick's surf contest. we're looking live. the waves look pretty good. the monster waves bringing out the best surfers to the bay area. it's not all fun and games. we'll show you the trouble amateur surfers got themselves into. >>> larry gerston is in washington, d.c. for the party and for the politics. we'll also take you live back to washington, d.c. >>> looking live at the san francisco 49ers flag flying in the golden sunrise this morning in san francisco. it is not only nfc championship game, it's also inauguration day, and also maverick's, approaching the mlk holiday. thanks for joining us. the weather will be perfect for whatever you decide to do. >> absolutely. a little chilly outside. we've got the numbers in the 20s and 30s again in the inland valleys. dry air. no clouds. that's been the case for the last few days. out toward san francisco, 42 degrees right now. offshore, the water temperature at half moon bay 52 degrees. the waves getting close to eight feet. at least the swell offshore. by the time that reaches the shore, breakers will be 15 to 20 feet today. temperatures pretty nice. mid-60s for most of the bay area. due to the offshore winds, that will make for the waves stacking up around pillar point. also coastal areas like santa cruz has a chance at 70s today. i'll have a look at changes ahead coming up in a few minutes. >> thank you very much, rob. >>> happening right now, half moon bay waking up on the surf world's radar this morning. world class surfers getting their wet suits on. and their boards are getting last-minute wax. the waves are doing what they're supposed to be doing. spectators arriving as well. the first heat is going to start in about 30 minutes off the coast of half moon bay. organizers are predicting monster waves. in fact, high surf created trouble for surfers at a number of bay area beaches yesterday. the coast guard provided help to several surfers who got caught up in powerful rip currents at both ocean beach in san francisco and dillon beach in marin. thankfully no one was seriously hurt. but the swells spelled trouble for am tours are just what the professionals have traveled from all around the world to experience at maverick. >> the surfers are going to have challenging conditions out there because of the long period in the offshore winds. winds will stand up really tall and then throw out really quick. it's going to be a challenge for the guys. >> the surf is expected to continue at bay area beaches today. we could see waves up to 30 feet. so the coast guard is again warning all beachgoers to be cautious of the water, even if you're not going into the water, and you're on the shore. >>> meantime, surfing fans got disappointing news as three of the top competitors in this morning's contest withdrew from competition yesterday. among them, 11-time pro tour champion kelly slater who did not give a reason, and dorian and borough both cited shoulder injuries. >>> new details this morning in the deadly shooting that shut down the b.a.r.t. station in san leandro yesterday. the search is on for as many as seven suspects in the shooting. b.a.r.t. police say two groups of people started shooting at each other in the bus stop area of the station yesterday afternoon. police say they believe the victim, an african-american man in his 40s, was an innocent bystander caught in the cross fire. the 16-year-old suspect was arrested but police say several other suspects took off moments after the shooting. >> one group was seen running in a certain direction, the other in the opposite direction. it was a pretty widespread crime scene. >> investigators searched the neighborhood around that station and found evidence at nearby homes. however, they would not elaborate on exactly what that evidence is. the bay fare b.a.r.t. station was shut down for nearly seven hours as investigators conducted their investigation. >>> the search is on this morning for the suspect involved in a deadly shooting in japan town. a 26-year-old man was driving in the area of fill more street around 5:30 yesterday evening when someone fired several shots at him. the suspect then got into a car and took off. the victim died of his injuries at the hospital. police have not released a motive for the shooting. >>> new this morning, a church in san francisco will honor dr. martin luther king jr.'s legacy this morning with a celebration of poetry and music. today's celebrations start at 9:00 this morning and run until noon. glide memorial church is on ellis street in san francisco. the event is free. and open to the public. >>> happening right now, a live look at the white house as president obama will be sworn into office in a small private ceremony at 8:55 this morning. earlier this morning, the president attended a wreath laying ceremony at arlington national cemetery before making his way back to the white house. vice president joe biden also was officially sworn in at the naval observatory just before 5:30 this morning. the big public celebration will happen tomorrow. coming up in about 20 minutes, our own political analyst larry gerston will join us live from washington, d.c., with more of what we can expect from the president during his second term after the parties have wound down. >>> an elite group of american heroes is set to embark on a pretty important challenge. they already sacrificed on the battlefield, and later this month they will push themselves to the physical limit again to climb mount fill a man jar oh. >> we appreciate it very much. >> reporter: for some the price of war is paid in limbs. and for a few, the heroics extend far beyond the battlefield. >> it's very, very interesting to get a chance to hear their stories. because these folks have been through a lot. >> reporter: the combat wounded veterans challenge aims to capture the special breed of soldier turned survivor, guys like danny swank, willing to still serve the community sharing stories, inspiring generations. >> i took shrapnel to both of my legs. >> reporter: danny and a new band of brothers are set to conquer a once unthinkable challenge, climbing moint kilimanjaro, and in the process, defeating an enemy that strikes most wounded veterans. >> they're just sitting around, moping around, wondering what they're going to be able to could the rest of their life. it gives them something to work for. and get out of bed for. >> i spent a year at walter reed. >> reporter: 30-year-old army staff sergeant billy costello who lost a leg to an ied in afghanistan, two young sons at home. >> we're a very active family, swimming or biking or doing something. so i had to let my kids know th that -- that that stuff was still going to be there. that we could still do all those things. >> reporter: and when he and other wounded veterans summit kilimanjaro, they'll do it side by side with a team of prosthetic experts and researchers. >> it is so humbling to be around these folks. they're just inspiring. they're all heroes. >> reporter: who use the climb to take the technology to new heights, too. >> we're gathering qualitative and quantity tiff data to create better fitting sockets and control the comfort, what they're going through. >> that's what's most important. >> reporter: so from military service to mountain summit, these heroes keep giving back. >> that was reporter danielle lee reporting. >>> three people are recovering this morning after they were hit by shotgun pellets at a gun show in north carolina. authorities say a shotgun accidently went off as the owner was unzipping the case to have the weapon checked by police. one person was hit in the torso. two others were hit in the hands. all three are expected to be okay. the owner wanted to sell that shotgun at the gun show. >>> another shooting at another crowded gun show. this one in ohio. investigators say a gun dealer was checking out a semiautomatic handgun he just bought when he accidently pulled the trigger. shooting the man next to him in the arm and in the leg. the gun's magazine had been removed but there was still a round in the chamber. the victim was taken to the hospital but it expected to be okay. >>> still ahead on "today in the bay," it is almost game time for the 49ers. what the team had to say about today's matchup against the atlanta falcons. >>> plus, could the giants be saying good-bye to brian the beard wilson. what the team has to say about their relationship with their closer. >>> who cares if it's beautiful weather outside when you have a football game to watch. the city by the bay is decked out in red and gold today in anticipation of winning that nfc championship game. the atlanta falcons are the only things standing in the 49ers' way, on a trip to the super bowl. we're about four and a half hours from kickoff. after an intense and focused week of practice, now all that's left is to take care of business at the georgia dome. >> this is 100% a business trip. this is what we work for all season. it's just going to be in atlanta, not here. >> we want to win it all. that's what we'll be remembered by the most. to go to the super bowl and winning. >> colin kaepernick has only started seven regular season games in the history of the nfl, only three quarterbacks have started fewer games than kaepernick, and reached a conference title game. >>> an interesting assignment for a reporter from our nbc affiliate in atlanta. going into hostile territory, flying your team's colors. let's see how that goes. >> reporter: wait until you see michael turner, baby! rise up, rise up! everybody rise up! >> not too many dirty looks. we are a friendly bay area, right? the kickoff for the nfc championship game is at noon. the winner, of course, headed to the super bowl. >>> from football to basketball, the warriors taking on the hornets in new orleans last night. city van curry missed the last two games with a sprained ankle. one of six warriors to finish in double-digit points helping the warriors snap that three-game losing streak. 116-112 the final score. >>> turning now to college hoops. cal visiting stanford yesterday. the pac-12 leading scorer managed just four shots in the first half. meanwhile, dwight powell put up 17 points with nine rebounds to help push stanford past cal 69-59. >>> the san jose sharks are leaving the lockout behind. the team kicks off its shortened season against the flames. a change in game time, though, the puck will crdrop at 3:00 an not 4:00. make sure you and your friends know that if you're planning on watching. >>> the brian wilson saga is likely coming to an end in san francisco. during an event in new york yesterday, giants general manager brian sabean told the new york post he doesn't anticipate wilson returning to the team this upcoming season. the giants did not offer wilson a contract back in november, making the all-star closer a free agent. wilson is recovering from his second reconstructive elbow surgery. >>> still ahead on "today in the bay," facebook is rolling out a new tool in hopes of making it easier for you to find what you're looking for on the web. we'll show you how it works. >>> here's a live view over san jose. golden sunshine kicking off the morning in the santa clara valley. >>> good morning to you. live view of the big rough surf hitting near half moon bay this morning. live pictures brought to you by our own erin murphy out there. waves could reach 30 feet. if you're outside, you've got all the clear skies and sunshine, but it's not especially warm. this is the case throughout the weekend. the last few days, still the same case this morning, no clouds. dry air. 20s and 30s inland this morning. 36 in san jose. 42 in san francisco. and the cold spot continues to be santa rosa, down to 29 degrees. 30 in fairfield. through the rest of the morning temperatures should warm up. the coastal areas will probably see the warmest temperatures of the day. upper 60s, maybe near 70 degrees. water temperature off half moon bay, 52 degrees. you've got waves eight feet high, at least the swell offshore. the wind offshore. what happens with the energy that approaches the coast, it slows down, the waves start to rise up, as they approach the shoreline, and with the winds offshore it gets the long faces building on the waves coming into pillar point. possible we could see breakers to 20 feet, but maybe closer to 30 around maverick. high surf advisory through 4:00. temperatures gorgeous today. another chilly start again tomorrow morning. not much change through tuesday. the end of the seven-day forecast will see changes come our way. sunny skies, high pressure just locking in the pattern. winter dry spell continues through at least tuesday. wednesday, we may see a slight chance of showers in the north bay. for the rest of the weekend, you're looking at nothing but sunshine and highs pretty mild, mid to upper 60s again today. from san jose south heading into morgan hill. 72 possible around santa cruz today. mid-60s around pleasanton. lower 60s toward concord. 64 san francisco. 65 in santa rosa. upper 60s around pacifica and half moon bay. next couple of days, golden sunshine for 49ers. as you head to the middle part of the week, a few extra clouds, and a pattern shift that will bring in a much better chance of rain dropping by saturday into sunday. this weekend, nice and sunny. next weekend looks like the rain will be coming back. >> we'll make sure to enjoy every minute. >>> facebook has 1 billion users and a ton of information, but bringing the two together has not always been easy. now a new search tool hopes to make it easier for you to find what you're looking for. but some fear it could also make it easier for people looking for your personal information. today in"today in the bay's" te expert -- >> reporter: you can search google and computer algorithms will scour the internet for information on gadgets. or soon try facebook's new search tool called graph search, and ask your friends without bothering them what they like. >> i need a plumber, i need a dentist, i need a doctor, and normally we would have asked our friends for that sort of stuff. that's how we used to do things for decades, or hundreds of years. and along came the search engines and we stopped asking our friends. >> reporter: graph search finds answers from people you do know, tapping into your network of contacts, and the information they've shared on facebook. facebook is taking aim at companies known for search, like google, yahoo! and twitter, even integrating microsoft's bing search engine into its products. >> we can say, hey, show me all my friends who like dentists that are in palo alto, and it's showing you the solutions. >> reporter: anytime facebook mentions data, users think security concerns. and now your data is searchable. >> any information that you put on there that's public is searchable. it's going to be found by someone. so really pay attention to your privacy settings, pay attention to who can see what you're putting on there, and really fine-tune that. >> reporter: more reason to think about what you're posting because there is now more information at your and your friends' fingertips. >> scott budsman told us facebook plans to make it easier to adjust your privacy settings. the company said the graph search feature will be rolled out gradually over the next few months. >>> a father promises his kids a puppy if they can get 1 million likes on their facebook book. he thought it would never happen. but then mom took this picture of the kids holding a sign reading, if we get 1 million likes, we get a puppy. the massachusetts family's page went viral with more than 1 million likes in just six hours. dad came through on his promition, and the family adopted this adorable lab/shepherd mix from the no-kill shelter in new york. just when dad thinks he has a foot up. no. >>> much more ahead on "today in the bay." we'll take you back live to washington, d.c., where the president will be sworn in in just about an hour. nbc bay area political analyst larry gerston is there and will join us with more on what president obama is expected to say. >>> looking live at the white house this morning. and an exciting day for the president. the swearing in today will be private. our political analyst larry gerston is there for what will be the public ceremony and all the parties and politics that go with it. first question, what does the president want to accomplish this time that he could not get done in the past four years? >> that's a great question, kris. look, four years ago, of course, the president was consumed with health care. really took up all the energy in the room, if you will. of course, you lost the super majority in the senate in his first four-year term. now we're looking at other substantive issues. the president will move on immigration reforms, and it looks like the republicans are ready to move, too. that's a victory for the president if it comes out that way. congress said it's time to move on immigration reform. there may be something coming together there. the president has already indicated his desire to move on the assault gun bans. and all the things relating all the way from background searches to magazine clips. we're less certain anything will come out of that. the big issues that are hovering, if you will, over everyone, like a big cloud, of course, is the debt, the sequestration coming up. we've got a three-month window, if you will, republicans are giving in on that. to allow more time to come up with a policy that will perhaps reduce spending in critical areas, and perhaps also raise taxes. that's the real big issue, kris. and so far, there's not a lot of movement there. but the pressure grows daily, particularly because the financial houses are saying, if you can't find a way to reduce this gap, you're going to be in trouble when it comes to your rating. >> you know, four years seems like a very long time, but when you're talking about moving a machine like washington's political machine, it takes a long time. people are already talking lame duck. is it too soon? >> that's right, kris. that's why really, if there's going to be any kind of substantive policy changes, they're going to come in the first two years of this term. because the last two years, everyone is pretty much waiting for the next person who will come in. so the president has to move quickly, and congress has to decide if they're going to come together. now, we know the last time around, the last four-year term, it was tough. the democrats won a couple more seats in the senate and house. but more than that, republicans are beginning to see that they just didn't have the right issues behind them in 2012, and they're also beginning to recalibrate the kind of things they're willing to do. that's why we think there could be major movement when it comes to immigration reform. >> larry, later on we know you're going to be decked out in a tux, black and white, of course. but this afternoon you'll be wearing red and gold, we hope. >> hey, let me tell you something. take a look at this. we're ready to go. we're ready to go here. as soon as i get off of this, the jersey goes on. we're going to lunch and then there's a big party for the 49ers, the mayors' meetings are here. ed lee, all the other folks, chuck reed, they're all meeting at a tavern. we're going to sneak in and i'm going to remove my political analyst hat and put on my sports reporter hat. >> party crasher, too, right? >> you bet. >> thank you very much, larry. have a great time in washington, d.c. what an excellent experience for you. >> thanks, kris. see you tomorrow night. >>> well, back here in the bay area, hundreds of people spent the day -- national day of service building homes in daley city. the volunteers rolled up their sleeves for habitat for humanity. the group built condos for 36 families, at least started them. when they're complete, families will get the keys. >> the volunteers are building the yard where the families will play. they're actually painting the doors to the homes that the families will live in. they're working on some of the roofs, putting the shingles on. it's a real experience like none other in the bay area. >> construction will continue for the next few months, and as in all habitat for humanity projects, the families also have to contribute a little bit of elbow grease of their own before they get to move in. that should happen sometime in late april. >>> happening now, we're watching those waves, and they look freezing and big. we are just moments away from the start of the much-anticipated maverick surf contest. the first one we've seen in three years. meteorologist rob mayeda joins us with a final look at today's forecast. i don't know that they could have picked a better day. >> that's one of the equations to pick the big swells here. it's a good convergence of the sunshine and the big surf. but if you're not a professional surfer, or accustomed to the long-term swell, in terms of rip currents, stay away from the beaches today. again, for mavericks, it's good news. waves 15 to 20 feet, maybe sets as high as 30. we'll see heading into the afternoon. up and down the coast today, high surf advisory through 4:00. use a lot of coaaution out on t coast. nice if you head out to the beaches but use extreme caution. stay away from the shore at least today and tomorrow until the surf backs off. mid-60s, nice start to the work week. chilly with patchy frost. more clouds on wednesday. that may toss a few showers into the north bay. best chance of rain arrives on saturday. >> from mavericks to the niners to the sharks at 3:00. a busy day. >>> we hope you enjoy every moment of it. here's a last look at the waves at maverick. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press" with david gregory. >>> good sunday morning. this is inauguration day for president obama. the public ceremony is tomorrow. but according to the constitution, his second term officially begins toy. moments ago the vice president was officially sworn in, and at noon today the president will take his official oath of office during a small private ceremony in the blue room of the white house. so the stage is set as well at the u.s. capitol for the inaugural address and public swearing in tomorrow. the president kicked off the weekend festivities yesterday with a day of service, and the first lady hosted a special concert for children of military families last night. >> this is what inauguration is all about. it's about celebrating who we are as americans and all the things that makes this country so great. and when i think about who we are, when i
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i see it, is what should have been. i think we should extend, if not and the debt ceiling issue. we should set it aside for a considerable period of time. we should tackle sequestration and we have to do that in the next six weeks. so i'm hopeful that we don't drag this out as some people are saying and then move on to the serious discussion of tax reform and environment issues. so i see it in a sense the opposite way. i say let's get this done, the sequestration part in the debt ceiling in the next six weeks and then move on. those who are saying let's do it dribble by turbo, they are the ones who would be undermining the effort to sit down and have a serious discussion of tax reform. >> we've got about two minutes left. francine. >> the question about itemize deductions. what s-sierra thought of having a cab, that people can use it for whatever they want for mark h., whatever. >> i think the problem with the cap is that it has to seriously consequence, especially for charitable contributions. because a substantial portion of the charitable contributions come from the very wealthy.
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 6:00am EST
, a discussion on the debt ceiling and deficit reduction debate. this was part of a brookings institution forum on jobs and the economy. this panel is an hour or and 20 minutes -- an hour and 20 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> all right. should we get started again? um, i'm either using that vision, or that clock is way off. but i'll use my watch. okay. so if everybody could come in from coffee and sit down, we'll get started on our second panel. and we're delighted to welcome a really terrific set of panelists, lew kaden, vice chair of citi, maya macguineas who is now involved in or leading the fix the debt campaign. bob mcdonald who is the ceo and president of procter & gamble, and ralph schlosstein who's the ceo of ever corp.. so really a terrific group. let me just give a little bit of context, at least while everyone's filing into the room. i'm martin baily with the economic studies program at brookings. if we cast our minds back to the 1960s, the 1960s, obviously b, was a troubled decade politically, but economically growth was pretty strong. productivity growth wa
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 7:30am EST
-span.org. .. >> ben bernanke called on congress to raise the debt ceiling. he said the u.s. can avoid defaulting on its day. the dean and the university's ford school of public policy moderates this discussion. this is just over an hour. >> thank you very much. it is also my great pleasure to welcome all of you here today, and on the half of the gerald r. to ford school of public policy, the university of michigan is extremely honored to welcome the honorable ben bernanke, chairman of the board of governors of the federal reserve system. today's conversation is the latest in a series of distinguished lectures, "policy talks @ the ford school." we are so pleased that susan white could introduce today's event and we're also very pleased to have president mary sue coleman with us today, as was regions american nelson and power, who were already mentioned to you. we also have several of the university executive officers and deans. and i would like to welcome all of them to thank them for joining us today. while it's an honor and truly a personal pleasure for me to introduce our special gu
NBC
Jan 23, 2013 4:30am PST
vote is scheduled for this morning on a measure to suspend the debt ceiling through may. this is different from bills which raised the amount the government could borrow. republicans and the obama administration support the plan because there is no dollar figure attached. critics know the plan amounts to a band aid and doesn't address the larger spending issues. >> 4:51 now. coming up, we're going to break. the new thing to do if you are a niners fan. >> and the super bowl staple that could have you digging deeper into your wall wallet. >> bummer. looking at the east shore freeway. nice spacing. i'll give you an update on the 580 crash coming up. >>> welcome back. how about a cold reality check from chicago? temperatures around zero. firefighters fought a five alarm fire. that's frost. looks like snow on the building. that's the water that's frozen instantly when the firefighters were fighting the fire. obviously the fire is out. that's extreme temperatures about 10 firefighters out there spraying water on it. looks like a winter wonderland. that's crazy. temperatures here, not b
NBC
Jan 21, 2013 6:00am PST
the debt ceiling increase which seems like a ritual now where we go up to the edge of that cliff and then at the last-minute we deal with that. there still is continuing problems. i think part of the theme is continuity trying to address the problems that have persisted over the last four years. >> thank you so much. we'll talk to you one more time. thank you so much. >>> the time now is 6:16. right now we want to give you a check of the day's top stories. the san francisco 49ers on top of the world heading to the super bowl. the team arriving at san jose international airport last night after beating the falcons 28-24. it was a spectacular victory. they'll face the baltimore ravens in super bowl xlvii in two weeks. >>> 100 people are allowed to return to their homes near sacramento after a freight train derailed sunday morning. hazmat crews had to evacuate the entire neighborhood when a clear substance started leaking from one of the cars. that liquid was not dangerous. >>> five of the six suspects accused in the rape and death of a medical student in india will be in an indian cour
NBC
Jan 21, 2013 5:00am PST
problems, debt ceiling, has continued to be a big problem and in a few months they'll have to debate that issue again. so there are a number of priorities. i don't know how specific he'll be in his speech today because generally presidents like to focus on large scale issues that everyone sort of agrees on and talk generally about needing to come together as a country. i think he's going to try to make it an inspirational speech. i don't know how specific he'll be about particular issues. >> with that said, in three weeks from now he'll give the state of the union. how do you come up with a speech today and how does that differ from what we expect to hear three weeks from now? >> he's been working for several months on this speech to try to make one big last plea i guess for national unity. he's trying to make it a memorable speech and inspire people. i would imagine he's looking for something that will motivate americans to sort of come together and perhaps young people. that was a core demographic for him like john kennedy inspiring a new generation to public service. so i think pr
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 2:00pm EST
i happen to know that the rich get it for their children, because i grew up in privilege. they tell me, they do not think i will tell you, but i will. they tell me, they do not think i will tell you, but i will. in new york city, the top eight preschools, that guarantee success in life, not just academic but social -- a number that can be plastered on your forehead and a standardized exam. the top preschools, they call them baby ivies. no pretense of a meritocracy. they cost $26,000. here's what i'm saying right now -- if i were the president, i would take all those billions of dollars being wasted right now on at the corporations, and i would put that money into three full years of the best preschool education in the entire world. if they cannot afford to do that, talk about $30 billion -- if we cannot afford to do that, i do not see what help we have upholding any sense of dignity, pretense of democracy, in the eyes of people in the rest of the world. [applause] >> i just have to add one thing to that -- one point i will add, to deny this to children is an act of thievery, but it is worse than stealing a car. this is an irreversible theft. you never get to live the second year of your life again. thatthis is it -- you get it once. then it is gone forever. i think the president fails to act on this aggressively, that dramatically, prophetically, to get this for us quickly -- i think is not just a budgetary issue. i think it is a theological abomination, a crime against the innocent. >> i agree. [applause] i say all the time, quoting -- the conversation could not be more timely. i sell the time, quoting dr. king, that budgets are moral documents. you can say what you say, but you are what you are. we know who you are when you put your budget on the table. we can see what your budget priorities are. could not be more timely. we are days away -- it will be a big party on monday, but after monday as we move toward the debt ceiling conversations and the spending cuts get placed on the table, the poor are likely to take it on the chin. that is why we are here with in washington tonight having this conversation. our hashtag is #povertymustend. our website is afuturewithoutpoverty.com. you'll find a letter on that website -- you can electronically sign it asking the president to give a major public policy address on poverty sooner than later, and second to convene a white house conference on the eradication of poverty to bring experts to get into crafting national plan to cut poverty in half and eradicate it in the richest nation in the world. it is not a skill problem, it is via upawe have the will to the poverty a priority with in this country? >> you have to have the real economy. but we have now? i am amazed -- you could talk about public education, we could talk about health care. everyone knows that a single payer health care system would -- insurance would cover everyone. insurance companies would be gone. cost, quality, access would be at a premium in terms of our ability to be a civil society if we had a single payer health care system. we could generate almost 3 million jobs, which would serve to stimulate the rest of the economy when you are building -- and actually taking care of the people. they know that in washington. viable. -- valuable. they just want to privatize it. i think you all doing a beautiful job -- the nurses appreciate you so deeply. honestly, the progressive caucus, the black caucus -- but one of the things that you said, and i completely agree, is that you have got to push. we have got to treat a movement in this country -- occupy was a moment. it needs to start up and keep going -- it needs to bring millions of people with it. the robin hood tax, the campaign the nurses have -- $350 billion a year from wall street for a minimum tax. you know what one of the legislator said to one of our nurses going to the capitol and talking about the wall street tax? she said, you nurses need to lower your expectations. the nurse looked at her and said, would you like for me to say that to you when i am prepare you for surgery? the true story. i mean, honestly, literally, it is a disgrace -- lower your expectations? i see what is happening out here every day. we're not going to lower our expectations. we're going to fight for a real economy. our economy has been hijacked -- we can talk about all the problems, talk endlessly about what i heard yesterday -- i heard about a woman yesterday. we heard about a real woman yesterday from michigan who actually chose to have her leg amputated because she could not afford the antibiotics in terms of taking care of her leg. she had her leg amputated because of money, because of money, because we do not have a health care system. it is a disgrace. the robin hood tax can generate $350 billion -- they have bipartisanship. they're keeping everything off the agenda that is important to us. they have bipartisanship on that. we cannot compromise our principles. we can compromise on taxes, the people have to say, line in the sand. learn that from the labor movement. say, this is a line that you do not cross. we want their jobs back. we want our pensions. we want to raise standards for everyone in america. nurses do not want to discriminate. we want a civil society. we want a society -- where is win in[applause] >> let me ask you -- roseann said something that got my attention a few seconds ago. it is the notion of whether or not as a society -- has the demos, have we lowered our expectations? police say to the citizens who in fact have lowered -- what we say to the citizens who have lowered their expectations -- there's always debate about what the proper role of government ought to be. i suspect it will have more of that in the coming days about what the proper role government should be -- what are our expectations? are they too low? some of my friends on the right will see the opposite -- the expectations of government are too high. talk to me about expectations -- what do we have a right to the world? >> i think it is important what they were saying about what should be done -- it is not theory, it is actually being done in countries around the world with demonstrated, proven results. every child in many countries in europe start out with that preschool. the results are that unlike this country, there is not hereditary poverty. it is proven -- this is not a theory. what you are saying about the health system is completely proven. our health system costs an extra $750 billion a year for exactly the same services that you would get in other countries. at the institute of medicine issued a report that the waste and fraud that comes from this for-profit system is 5% of national income, wasted. that sector owns washington. it is not clear -- that is what other countries do. we are just not normal. our politics got hijacked. >> but we are the greatest nation in the world -- is that notion of american exceptionalism. how can this be happening elsewhere and not be happening in the greatest nation in the world? >> one of the things the greatest nation in the world refuses to do is look at any other nation. >> exactly. i [applause] >> and to see what it is doing. you know, the turning point of this country was 32 years ago, almost to the day, when ronald reagan made a statement in his inaugural address that the solution to the government -- the government is not the solution to our problems, government is the problem. if you believe that, do not the president, for heaven's sake. you had a president who was inveighing against government. presidents of both parties have basically continued this policy. we have no active programs to solve any of these problems. we know what the solutions are -- we're not going to pay for any of them. i'm telling you, sadly, it is getting worse. no matter what the agreement is in two months. we are squeezing -- the rich have gotten their way. the corporate sector has gotten their way. they do not pay. there is no money for this preschool. all the sectors alone and -- own and operate the congress, so we have overpriced systems, exactly what you say, schools that do not work. we have the least social mobility of any high-income country in the world now. we havewe have kids locked into poverty like no other high- income countries in the whole world. because you cannot get out of it for exactly the reason jonathan said. by the time they're six years old -- is so stark in the evidence. >> as jeffrey's talking now -- you recall last year when we had a wonderful panel about poverty. a wonderful panel last year. a great line last year -- there is a highway into poverty but not even a sidewalk out. there is a highway into poverty but not even a sidewalk out. that is the point -- it is so did, hard to get out. poverty is no longer color- coded -- this is not a black thing, not a brown thing -- this is an american catastrophe that is about -- dr. west and i, said the new poor in this country are the former middle- class. and that ofthat is what is happening in our society. >> thank you very much. it is such a rich conversation. i am glad to be a part of it. where to begin? no matter what your leanings are and whether you know about education or not, let's turn to some of the language you are talking about. ebb that theinvesting in very young children is the best investment you can make. it has the greatest return on that and the investment. we know that because the first years of life are the most important for cognitive, social, it and emotional development. you are only two years old ones. -- once. that is the most significant window of time. which brings me to the next point, yes, we have class warfare. those who are poor are completely left out of the national dialogue on poverty and take it hunger. that is a bipartisan effort, to keep people who are poor out of the national dialogue. that is why i work with low income women to be able to take photographs and provide direct testimony on their experiences with raising children in poverty, how to break cycles with poverty, and there are so many conversations happening. this concept of violence and betrayal. people have been silenced for so many years. poverty is solvable. they and expect nothing less. they are raising their children and they expect their child to in a be the president of the united states, a lawyer, a doctor, and they want the best education, the best type of food, a safe and affordable home to live. the women we work with are investing so much into their children. they are having to trade off paying for rent and paying for food, and trade off for whether they keep the lights on and pay for food. that is unconscionable. [applause] thank you. all of us can expect more. low income women should be included in the national dialogue. the women i have spoken with our genius. -- are genius. they are brilliant to survive in the united states today. they are so fantastic entrepreneurs. they are wise. they have a lot of grit. they are stronger than any of us on stage. it is a brain trust in america we are not utilizing. they should be part of the national dialogue at a part of the stage and being listened to in congress. not just the special interest lobbyists. [applause] >> we are going into the last hour of the program. we want to highlight the fight back. there are people in this country who are succeeding against the odds every day as they struggle with poverty. there are persons who will join us on the front row. they are already here. i will get off the stage and talk to them so we can hear from citizens, who are in this fight every day. we want to put a face on poverty. while you are talking, talk to me about what you make of the fact that the new poor are in fact the former middle-class. they make up every race, every ethnicity. when we talk about poverty, people think as the poor as those people. they are increasingly becoming us. people are losing their jobs, their 401k. >> we are in the middle of an economic disaster. andit is crushing people. it is very dangerous. it can zap their capacity. this is a big threat to the country. we underestimate the danger. jeffrey knows the story dramatically better than i do. loaning small amounts of money only to women in order to create who micro entrepreneurs. there are ways in which we say to people, the passive. -- be passive. we ought to be saying, if we could wave a magic wand and tomorrow have 6 million small businesses, one of the things we should seriously look at with tax reform is how do you replace the anti-poor, anti- small business tax. it is the first big hurdle to create a job. how could you design the equivalent for starting your own business? trying to reach out here and realize, every american could be an entrepreneur. passing so many laws and regulations and taxes that they kill the start up businesses in ways that are crazy. >> i have to jump in. thank you so much for talking about entrepreneurship. you were there, you were a part of that. there has been so much destruction to the assistance program. talk about rules and regulations. those are things your administration, when you were the speaker of the house, so many of those types of rules and regulations were built into the program, so much that they have not responded to the recession. it is only able to reach about 30% of the children who are poor in this country. an incredible increase in child poverty been. micro finance would may be a great way to insert into the system. if a woman is receiving cash assistance or food stamps and she happens to, may be working on the side doing hair and nails, housekeeping, child care. fantastic things. that $50 or $100 she makes on the weekend, god forbid she reported to the case manager because she would be criminalized for something that would be celebrated in this country. [applause] >> i agree with you. >> i want to tell you that would have been lovely if you could have thought of that 17 years ago. [applause] >> i wish i had. >> think of the damage done. >> he said i wish i had. he did say that. i have got you on the microphone. what you have just said now is wonderful. the fact she is agreeing with you is amazing to me. but hip-hop>> shocking. >> you were in the media almost immediately when this fiscal cliff deal was reached. you were in the media almost immediately, you were very disappointed, very upset at this deal that was struck. i got the sense you were spanking your fellow republicans for getting their clocks cleaned by mr. obama in that debate. tell me what you are upset about and is there some revenge exacted? >> we have very severe long- term fiscal problems. i think there is a lot more that is at the big banks door and the federal reserve's door. it is amazing neither party has been willing to look at the problems. we are faced with enormous long-term challenges on the fiscal side. i thought the whole process was wrong. i have a bias. i was speaker of the house. the idea that the senate at the last minute would write an entire bill, put whatever they wanted into it, send it over, and say, pass it as we wrote it. we will not touch it again. and the house said, ok. crazy. nobody read that bill. it violated everything republicans complained about with the stimulus. the minimum they could have done was brought it up, actually read it, maybe had a hearing to find out what was in it and what did it mean. there were millions of dollars willi understand why the president wants to take care of its friends. what did that have to do with the bill? a goody here and a few other goodies there. notrepublican senators wrote what they wanted. it is a bad way to run free society. >> we just passed a farm bill. my colleagues -- and i will call them that because i am in public -- voted to cut $16.50 billion over the next years. i voted against it because i thought it was outrageous. they voted against it because they did not think it was enough. we have people who literally work in the house of representatives who do not believe they are in poverty in this country. any of them, i want you to go to the other side of town to wherever it is you live. people believe if you do not work, you are lazy. these are the craziest people i have ever seen in my life. absolutely nuts. [applause] if we continue to send people to congress who do not understand what their job is, then we are never going anywhere as a country. these people are evil and mean. they cared nothing about anybody but themselves. [applause] >> let me ask you, though. i am really feeling sorry for you. i will push you higher up on my prayer list tonight. there are people who are entrenched in congress, they come from districts where this is not their priority, not their issue, so congress is polarized around the issue of poverty. there is a consensus poverty does not matter. congress is polarized on this issue. how do we ever imagine that the plot of the poor will get addressed. class getting these little blurbs. make them sit down, convene a group of people to address the issues of poverty. people out there have to stop being silent. anytime i get a phone call in my office, i believe at least 50 of my constituents believe the exact same thing. if you start calling your congress people and your senators and say to them, you want them to address poverty, trust that they listened very do not assume or be angry when you turn on the news at night and tourism at your television. it cannot talk to us. you have to do it yourself. if you don't, once again, every year, one of us takes the food stamp challenge. people get the news. until we get more voices, until more people understand how important and significant it is for us, they are going to continue to pat us on the head and say, your food stamp challenge week. until they see hungry people, until they see babies who do not eat every day, until they realize the fastest-growing group of children in schools today is hungry and homeless children, until we can make them see it, they will not believe it. >> that is a perfect segway. -- segue. for those who just tuned in, this is our hastag. #povertymustend. our website is afuturewithoutpoverty.com. you will find a letter. it is already written for you. encouraging the president to do things quickly. deliver a major public policy address on the eradication of poverty. we have been told over and over he is an organizer. it is time for the community to get organized and let the president know we want to hear we will from him, we want him to deliver a major public policy address on poverty. we can do this every day. this is no comparison between what we are doing and what would happen if the president of the united states gave a major policy speech on what he will do to eradicate poverty. and then he gave us an assignment to do to help him get it done. he ought to give a major public policy address. bring the experts together. i will not be in that meeting. i am not an expert. i am just a broadcaster to open up a whole for the experts to run through. a plan to cut poverty in half in the short run, eradicate it in the long run. if the president wants a legacy in which he and we can be proud, he will have to make poverty a priority in the second term. sign that letter and let him know about it. >> i do not want to be in that meeting, either. i would not go. at least a crack addict is honest about their addiction. the white house is addicted to power. they are addicted to power. it is not just about power. it has to do with love and justice. love and justice is always weak. that is precisely why tradition in this history of this nation has been the democratic loaf. we recognize we have to have a this is why i resonate with my conservative brothers. martin luther king jr. was under fbi surveillance until the day he died. government can be oppressive, vicious, ugly, violate your rights, generate propaganda. we need that, too. government can be affirmative, if they are helping poor and working people. government can help use its power for elites. when they come together with no accountability whatsoever, not just politically, but economically. let me say this. martin luther king jr. today could be taken to jail without due process or judicial process under the national defense authorization act because he had a connection with a freedom fighter, nelson mandela. he just got off the terrorist list in 2008. he had a relation to a terrorist. under the present administration, and you can take americans to jail without due process. the black freedom movement has always been suspicious of it. headwe have black prisoners in their precisely because they were willing to tell the truth that was a threat and we do not talk about them. that is why the culture of fear is not just violence. people are afraid. they are afraid to lose their jobs. they are afraid to lose their status. not going to be nice tea parties, the white house. you cannot have a culture of fear and generate a movement. it is not just about justice. we have got to talk about love. martin was a titan of love. if you are not talking about love and willingness of sacrifice, we are not going nowhere. you have to be willing to hit the streets, go to jail, to die. that is what it is about. if you are not willing to do that, keep your job and drink your tea. emergency. [laughter] [applause] people are dying out here. >> since you went there, this is foreign to a lot of people. martin has been gone for so long now. the nation knows the president will be sworn in for a second term on monday, on the martin luther king jr. holiday. just blocks down the street, the monument. the president will put the hand on the bible of martin luther king jr. as he is inaugurated. king is always present in our conversations. he is present tonight. if you raise this notion of love, since martin, the notion of love, and our public policy have been absent, you talk about and try to put love -- we heard about compassionate conservatives, i want to ask you whatever happened to compassionate conservatism -- but love, at the center of our public policy, it is a foreign concept. that is exactly what martin did. he put love at the center of the public square. why have we abandoned that notion? >> the rule of money. everybody and everything is up for sale. you cannot have integrity, love, you cannot have trust if everything and everybody is up for sale. if your leaders are up for sale, they will talk one way, get inside, and do something else. it is big money. for black people who have been hated for 400 years, institutionalized hatred coming after us, and we dish out martin king, that love in the face of the hatred, that is a spiritual and moral high ground. the whole country has to take note of it with martin. the whole world has to take note of it. that is what is weak and feeble. it is not a question of skin pigmentation. it is a question of equality and morality of your spirituality. all of us fall short. [applause] >> now it is competition. the president takes no child left behind, which is the worst education law in my lifetime -- [applause] straight out of charles dickens. train them for exams, do not let them -- they might start asking why politicians do not keep their promises. no talk of love. the president takes no child left behind and he softens it. a race for the top. there will be 12 winners. the word enterprise, i am a very patriotic american. i like capitalism. thatit is good to me. the word enterprise is sickening. it has had a pathological effect on our attitudes. these wall street guys who want to privatize our schools are setting up academies. dr. martin luther king academy of leadership and enterprise. or they will name them for langston hughes, frederick douglass. should let the name the schools. [laughter] [applause] they should name it for people they do not like. [laughter] here are a few points. i will be unfashionable tonight. everyone in washington seems to think the way to solve the problems in our schools is to not give them another cent, another penny, to improve and make the schools look like places that are inviting and respect the value of children. aesthetics count. do not do that, but beat up on their teachers. that is the trend today. [applause] attack the unions. i heard about the teachers union from teachers in l.a. last fall. i flew to chicago to stand with them the day they went on strike. they were right to go on strike. [applause] i will tell you something. i am in schools all the time. when i was a young teacher, i remember this. schools are overwhelmingly -- the teachers are women. you go to a convention, if you are a guide, there are like 50 women for every guy. it is wonderful. i love it. [laughter] when they scapegoat teacher unions, the ruthless way they do, they are attacking some of the largest unions in this country of devoted, unselfish, inspired, loving, tender, good, female human beings. they are women. it is an attack on female women. [applause] i remember dr. king's last words when he said i have been to the mountain. that mountaintop is something that is a symbol of hope. it is biblical. it is something we would like to get back to. we wish we could get there again. but the dialogue of school reform is just like the dialogue of health care. icayune. there is nothing transcendental in it. there is nothing courageous in it. they are tinkering around the edges of an equity. -- inequity. that is what president obama is doing. fix the schools, they say. fix the schools. a very suggested word. it is a mechanistic terms. as though our schools were out, and our kids were commercial commodities. i hate that word. here is what i believe. i think that is emblematic of the low level of dialogue. my favorite american poet happens to be langston hughes. i read his poetry to my fourth graders. it was considered dangerous. curriculum deviation, i was fired. i was hired shortly after by the johnson administration. [laughter] my favorite worldwide poet happens to be the irish poet. william butler yeats. there are lines many of us learn in school and forget. he said, the best lack all conviction while the worst are full of passionate intensity. we need that passionate intensity on our side, on the side of the poor children in this earth. i beg the president to summon up the courage to give us that voice. if he does not, it would be a terrible betrayal of his role and he will miss an opportunity to leave behind a beautiful legacy in history. it will be his tragedy as well as ours. [applause] >> we are clearly headed to a real debate about austerity. i do not believe austerity is the answer. some people do. there is a big debate in the coming weeks as we get to this debt ceiling debate. talk to me, from your perspective, about this notion of compassionate conservatism. there was a movement 12 years ago to present that as an alternative. what happened to that? >> i would be glad to go down that road but i do not think it is useful. to gently develop a real understanding of how to break through at every level, housing, learning, jobs. and who i always told people, as showered with more african- americans than most republicans knew, had a deep, passionate commitment with every american he met. his heart was big. he did love everybody, to a point where it drives you crazy. you think, slightly less love, jack, it is ok. the use of it by the bush people was a political slogan to show they are softer than the gingrich republicans. they did not think through any serious, systematic program. i want to commend you. sitting here, i had two ideas, sufficiently radical, that would never have occurred without this[applause] i did not say right or left. i just said radical. [laughter] one is talk about schools and talk about saving the children. then figure out what saving children leads you to, which involve nutrition, prenatal care, a lot of things. if you start with saving children, you somehow skip the bureaucracy and start back. want to say to the congressional head of the black caucus, i want to step away out here. >> i cannot imagine you doing that. [laughter] >> i was impressed with the intensity of your comments. [laughter] i think part of the challenge we have in america is the real dialogue that takes more than 90 minutes, or more than two and a here is my proposal, which i will carry to the republican side, if the congressional black caucus wants to do this. i believe the congressional black caucus members should offer to match up with a republican member, each going together to spend three days in your district, for example, and you spend three days in the republican district, and those days will lead to a conversation that will help us move back to help the by partisanship and help each side had a slightly different understanding, and maybe start to create french ships from which we could actually begin to rebuild the ability to govern. [applause] >> if you could make it work, i am in. if you could get your side to do it, i am in. that is a very good proposal. >> check it out and tell me how many of your folks are willing to visit. i will find republicans to make >> i love it. [applause] >> when you are all reflecting together, try to come up with strategies of how you can sever the link with those who control both of your party. [applause] >> i will let rose and say what she wants to say. my warning to the camera operators, i will walk in front of her to get out to the audience to talk to our special guests. they are everyday american people. the truth is americans, our fellow citizens, are doing the best they can with what they have and where they are. every single day. the fight back without government help coming through, on the evil of austerity is real. >> i was glad i was here. one of the things that is usually absent, there is an effort with the hon neo-liberal agenda, everything should be for sale, to vilify teachers, to vilify anything public. the corporations have been in control and this country is in disaster. i want to talk about the american labor movement, who is behind social security, one of the greatest anti-poverty programs. we have to have -- the president cannot cut care for the most vulnerable people in our society. medicare is such a critical program. also pushed by the american labor movement. the other thing it does is to set a new high for wages, living wages for people. benefits, pensions. if you can find a job in america, get past the terrorism corporations do. if everything were unionized, we would have wall street on the run. [applause] >> stand up, all three of you. turn that way. we will have a conversation for a couple seconds. i said to my staff that i wanted to make sure i talked to everyday people who can tell their own stories and own words trying to navigate their way through poverty. let me ask you to thank them in advance for their courage for what they are about to share to come on national television to share their story. [applause] i want to start with mary ann, who is willing to come on long national tv to share her story. some of us make bad choices in life. somebody say, amen. those choices put us in situations where you have to wrestle with poverty. there is always a better way. there is a way out. there is an end to poverty. some people to call and find their way out of the situations they put themselves and. mary ann is an authentic american hero. let me give her a couple seconds to tell her own story about being a substance abuser. as a result of those bad choices, finding herself deep in poverty. i want you to hear where she started and what she is doing now. take a minute and tell your story in your own words. >> first, i do not necessary believed it was a bad choice, as it was a symptom of deprivation. it came to me and we talked about love. i grew up in a middle-class family. it was not about money so much about love and deprivation. i ended up using heroin for 23 years of my life. at the end of my addiction, i was introduced to crack. i thank god for it. it hit me so fast so hard i hit rock bottom so they could treat me again. for the third or fourth time. i ended up getting myself together and going to a french culinary arts schools and vocational rehab. i landed in a place where i had an opportunity to work with men and women just like me. i worked every day. [applause] i had the opportunity to work every day with men and women also suffering from deprivation. they are not just homeless and hungry. they need healing. the approach is that holistic week, we try to empower our students, of which 90% are either coming back from prison and/or are substance abuse folks. there are an increasing number of people who come to us with mental health issues. we try to shorten the line. we prepare 5000 meals a day that goes to social service agencies that give the folks we were with the support they need. it is not just about jobs and education and housing, but healing as well. [applause] >> how about that? thank you. this is a conversation about self-sufficiency. your thoughts, a quick word about the choices or the lack thereof so many brothers and sisters have when they paid their debts to society. they come out and have that record and draw their efforts. they cannot get an opportunity. they cannot get a second chance. they cannot get their lives on track. >> that is what greatness is all about. some sense of service and love and self confidence and self- respect. i see it in you and feel it in your spirit. we have to allow that to spill over so it has to do with public policy. not just personal. i want to keep the focus on you right now. i salute you. [applause] >> this is tammy, a 20 year-old mother of one son. 21 now, excuse me. you are grown. [laughter] she found herself a teen mom. she is not the only one in this country and mary ann was talking earlier about the difficulty many young women have trying to navigate through poverty when you are a mother of a young child. she is a student at northeastern university and studying political science. this is the fight back we are talking about. please say a quick word about what it is like trying to navigate through poverty when you are a single mom and what you say to all of those single moms watching right now trying to navigate the same journey. >> thank you for having me. it is not easy to be able to come and leave my baby back. i was feeling sad. i did not want to leave him. this is a fight for plenty of women, and not only single mothers. single fathers out there as well that struggle just as much as i do. [applause] i know plenty of them and they struggle. picture this. you are a single parent, but you have to come up with a way how to feed your family, work at the same time to pay bills, and go to school to get an education to better your life. last year, i only made $8,000 the whole year. my food stamps were cut. that was the only way i was able to feed my son, $85 a month. the average family spends close to $500 or more. you expect me to spend $85 and live with that for my son. we had to be sent to a shelter because my mother no longer wanted us living with her. i had to pay rent at that shelter, get food stamps, have my own food in that shelter, and yet i was also a freshman at northeastern university. how was i going to do all of this at once? people ask me how i was doing this. you are an incredible woman. i am not. i am a normal person trying to fight for my son to have a better life than i did. [applause] i may seem extraordinary because of all of the things i have been able to do, but i am not. i am a mother trying to fight for my child. [applause] i am studying political science because i want to be up there in the future to show that they are the experts. [applause] most are through research. the true experts, counting myself, are out there. i want to be able to, in the future, show everyone else, counting the president, that statistic, that is not my name. i am not a statistic. i am an individual trying to make my life better. when you ask me how i am able to be a student, pay my bills, get food stamps, but you are cutting my food stamps, so i am not able to pay for food for my son, so, technically, you are taking the ability to feed my son, and then you ask me, how are you able to accomplish all of this? i say, thank god for someone like mary anna who is able to come and say, take pictures of what you experience, show other individuals what you face day- to-day, and i am able to tell other people they are not alone in this struggle. i am afraid every day what i am going to do every 24 hours and how i will be able to pay my bills. if i make 1 cent more, my food stamps will be cut more. and i will not be able to pay it all at the same time. i am on a scholarship but that can get cut, too. but you expect me to hold up a 3.0 for a 4.0 gpa on my own, trying to work, be a mom, and a student at the same time. but i am a statistic. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you. say a quick word. tell me more about this program. >> it is to break this silence. there is so much in the national rhetoric, so much shame and stereotypes about people who are poor. witnesses to hunger is about making sure women who are strong have an opportunity to speak back and participate. tammy is a great example. there are many people among us and all across the country who are witnesses to hunger. they need to speak up to break the shame. there is courage. thank you. they are amazing. >> that person is my mother. she is here tonight. there are two sponsors that made this possible tonight. there are a lot of resources to make this possible. thank you, c-span, for carrying this conversation around the world. i also want you to thank the foundation for being our title sponsor tonight. [applause] marguerite casey foundation. she is organizing young people to express themselves and raise their own voices about the conditions they find themselves in. you heard me offer those statistics earlier tonight about what is happening, poverty, in the state of mississippi. about. we are going to leave the session ran now. the house will be back in for legislative business on tuesday, trouble, p.m. eastern. that gives federal employees a pay incress and just some of the news coming out of the republican treat that informs virginia. the house republicans leaders announced a plan to raise the debt limit for three months. the long-term increase would be con ting nt on the senate passing a bill by april 15. 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable louie gohmert to act as speaker pro tempore on this day, signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the prayer will be offered by the guest chaplain, reverend andrew walton, capitol hill presbyterian church, washington, d.c. the chaplain: let us pray. god of light and life, we give thanks for the gift of the day. a day which stands on the threshold of possibility and potential for the presence and power of love. love ensconced in every human at creation. love, which we are called to share with one another, as well as with creation itself. as we begin a historic weekend of service, celebration, and inauguration, fill us with your creative imagination to find our way to reconciliation where there is separation. to mercy where there is judgment. and to peace where there is violence. hold each of us, our leaders, our nation, and our earth in your eternal care. amen. the speaker pro tempore: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. the chair will lead the house in the pledge of aa-- in the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. at this time, without objection, the house will stand adjourned until 10:00 a.m., >> when the house returns on tuesday you can watch live coverage on c-span. in washington crews are finishing up work on bleachers lining pennsylvania avenue and the snand front of the white house all for the inaugeral parade and some of the touches here a heated glassed in area where the president obama will is it to watch the parade. >> a look there at some of the preparations for this week end's inauguration. c-span's coverage kicks off as president obama begins his second term. on sunday he will be sworn in officially at the white house shortly before noon eastern and our coverage includes your phone calls and we will look back. on monday the public nauggral ceremonies at the u.s. capitol. we'll have live all day coverage beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time right here on c-span. you can also tune in on c-span radio and cspan.org. join the conversation by phone, on facebook and on twitter. >> friday night on c-span we'll show you inaugural speeches from the last 60 years starting with ronald reagan, bill clinton from 1993, dwilingt eisenhower from 1957, harry truman from 1949, then john f. kennedy in 1961. george h.w. bush, jimmy carter and we'll wrap up the night with george w. bush's speech. see ten inaugural speeches from ten past presidents on c-span. >> up next senate his torn don richy gave a historical perspective on inaugurations describing how various treated the day and how so help me god became part of the ceremony. this is about an hour. >> now there is a phrase that journalists use a lot. it's called a go to guy. and i think you know what that means. it means somebody who knows a lot about something that the journalists can go to and get from that person reliable information. and there are not that many go to guys around. there are a lot of people in this town who have opinions. there are a lot of people in this town who are incredibly glib. but there are not that many people who are so fundamentally immersed in a subject. and an important subject that journalists and others, ack demics are attracted to that person. in my mind, the best example of a go to guy is our next speaker don richy. i've gone to him. and more than that, i've received ideas even a little bit of inspiration in terms of my own work. he is the his torn of the united states senate and as such he is the keeper of the family jewels, of the history of the united states senate. it's glorious, interesting, frackous cooperative history. i've known don for many years as i've known his predecessor and i'm so pleased to have him here to talk about not the senate today so much as about inaugurations which after all is the reason why we're all here. so it's my great pleasure to present historian of the united states senate, don rich chi. >> thanks very much. that was a pretty tough act to follow but i'll try my best. we're about to have an inauguration on monday and the first question that comes to people's mind often in inauguration as they are standing or sitting in the cold waiting on the ceremonies to begin is we have separation of powers in this country. how is it that the president of the united states is being sworn into office on the steps of the capitol t legislative branch of the government. how did this all come about? it's not in the constitution. if you read the constitution it's sparse. it tells you the date and time the president is to be sworn in and the exact words of the oath but it doesn't say anything else. but yet we have this long two centuries of tradition built up around presidential inaugurations. it comes down to which came first, the chicken or the egg. and the fact is in 1979 when this brand new government was getting started the first part of government to meet was the congress. it was supposed to meet on march 4 but congress has a hard time sometimes establishing a quorum so it wasn't then they could do business. the first order of business was to dount electoral ballots. it was relatively easy it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to doffs notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legitimate tors. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine except everybody in new york and anybody who could get to new york wanted to see george washington sworn in. they couldn't invite everybody in. but upstairs they had a balcony. you come upstairs and we'll have the ceremony here and washington can take his oath out on the balcony. those decisions happened because they were logical. ever since then presidents of the united states have been taking their oath more often than not outside and the senate has taken the lead in running the inaugural ceremonies. vice president adams was the president of the senate at the time and he was a useful player in all of this because he had been the u.s. minister to england. one of the big questions came up there are no seats up here in the senate chamber. there are no seats downstairs. in parliament they have to stand up because there aren't enough seats and that adds to the drama of the day and the members can stand up for the ceremony. fortunately we have seats for the house and senate on the reviewing board. but when washington arrived there was a lot of co-motion. he was welcomed, his barge came across the hudson river. there were parades and fire works and activities. and since the parades were before and not after, washington came to the senate chamber, the house members came upstairs and then he stepped out on to the platform and there was no supreme court in those days, there was 2340 chief justice of the supreme court but the chancellor of the state of new york then gave the either of office. and so here is president washington just been sworn in. the crowd cheers and then he comes back into the senate chamber and delivers an address. and there is no mention in the constitution of an inaugural address. but presidents of the united states have been giving inaugural addresses ever since president washington led the presession. one of the observers said washington who was the great strong man of american history was trembling while giving the address. he was inside so the people outside didn't hear what was going on. but of course washington's inaugural address was reprinted in newspapers all across the country shortly after that. then in 1793 after washington's first term was over, he was elected to a second term. they were in philadelphia at this point. and so at this point washington gave the shortest inaugural address, relatively brief remarks, but still following on to this tradition. and still the u.s. congress was hosting this institution. now one of the strange things about the inaugurations and one that leads to controversy is that as i mentioned that the constitution writes out the oath of office. and one thing that the constitution does not say is concluding the inaugural oath with so help me god. and yet most presidents say so help me god. and part of that is because there was a tradition, there was sort of a follow k lore that developed that washington said so help me god. and we historians have been looking for whether washington said or didn't say so help me god. we're not sure about this. one of the accounts given by washington irving who was five-year-old at the time of washington inauguration. but years later he gave his remembrance that washington said so help me god. we just don't know. it's up to the president of the united states to say whatever he wants. most presidents in the 19th century did not repeat the oath, they just said i do. starting about the 1880's presidents began to say so help me god. it's interesting to me that the chief justice who swears them in says so help me god. if you're going to be a strict interter of the constitution it's not there. the president can say it. you wonder why the chief justice puts this in. it's become tradition. and tradition is even more important than constitutional structure in this process. but it's become a point of controversy. i should say that chief justices of the united states have been known to fumble the oath of office. it's different than all the others. and one reason why they do fumble is they are used to giving the oath but it's not the same oath. the oath we take as staff of the senate or military offices or the judges take is the oath written by congress. and that oath does end with so help me god. and in fact, the military oath that washington's troops took during the revolution ended with so help me god. so it was natural for washington to have said it t at that occasion although not required. i will say in defense of chief justice roberts he is not the first to get the words a bit confused. william howard taft swore in hoover in 1929 and that ceremony was carried over the radio . and a little girl wrote in to justice taft and said you got the words wrong. and i was listening to it and that's not the order of the words. and he wrote back and said i'm sure i got them right. and of course the news media played the tapes and discovered he reversed some of the words in the order. it does not make a difference if the cheer justice gets a word out of word or skips a word. the presidents in the 19th century and even hoover in 1929 just said i do in this process and that is certainly appropriate as well. we move down to washington, d.c. the first inauguration is taking place and it's the first time there is a change in party from the fed raists to the new republicans or democratic republicans who saw themselves more as the party of the people. and thomas jefferson was going to be naug rated and he did not want a lat of fold all with his inauguration. jefferson stripped away a lot of the formalities of the presidency that built up. he is about where the library of congress stands today. and he just walks across the street. and he's dressed fairly kassly. and he goes to the senate chamber. why? because it happened to be the largest chamber in the capitol at the time. the house was meeting in a room that is occupied by a single senator just to give you some sense of proportions there because the house wing of the capitol hadn't been built yet. and thomas jefferson went to the inauguration. he was sworn in uzz by his cousin john marshall and he was sworn in with byrd, one of his political opponents. it must have been a tense inauguration. then he delivered his inaugural address in a voice that was so low that most people in the room, and the room was absolutely packed, most people couldn't hear what jefferson was saying. thomas jefferson as president for eight years delivered two public speeches in the entire eight years of his presidency. one was his first inaugural address, and the second was his second inaugural address. washington and adams went to give their state of the union addresses in person. but jefferson thought this was too much like the king going to parliament. he was going to strip that away. you set precedent from doing things and from thomas jefferson on presidents did not go to congress to deliver their state of the union address. they sent it up for a clerk to read. they missed an opportunity to take some leadership over the legislative branch. it's not until 1913 that wilson gets elected president and he says there is nothing to prevent me from going up there. this will be a great way for me to present my legitimate program to congress. wilson starts going in person. he is delighted he thought of something roosevelt didn't think of. ever since wilson, almost alm presidents of the united states have taken the opportunity to go to congress in person. jefferson, as i say, was trying to down play a lot of the ceremony but he also understood the need for an inauguration. he understood the purpose of it. after a decisive election, it was one of the most devicive where everyone has to choose sides and the country is split up t inauguration is the moment we come back together again. this is not a presidential candidate in front of us. this is the person who was elected. this is the person who is going to lead this country for the next four years. we need to put aside the election and heal the wounds of this election. and so in his election jefferson says we are all federalist now, we are all republicans. we are all americans coming together and we are going to work together because the hope that every president has in his inaugural address. but that is one of the main reasons for having this great ceremony each time is to put a cap on the end of the election and to bring this nation back together again for the president's -- for the next president's term. well, now you've got the government in washington. they've established a certain amount of precedence. by the times james is naug rated the capitol -- jamings madison was naug rated there, both of his terms of president. james monroe would have been naug rated in the old statutory hall, the house of representatives at the time. he would have been naug rated there except the british burned the building down in 1814. british troops marched across and came down maryland avenue, burned down the capitol and white house and most other public buildings in washington, d.c. so they could not hold an inauguration back in the house chamber. instead they had built a temporary capitol across the street that became known as the old brick capitol and it stood where the supreme court stands today. it wasn't big enough to accommodate the crowds so he is naug rated outside on the steps. it was a good tradition but it didn't immediately catch on because naug races in those days were held on march 4. if you think the weather is bad in january, stay around until march. we had a history of bad weather on march 4 so most presidents preferred to be naug rated indoors. andrew jackson when he becomes president. adams is in the old house chamber. andrew jackson is the man of the people. he's the great hero. he fight that is last battle at new orleans we're about to have the buy centennial of. and he draws a very large crowd to washington, d.c. when he becomes president in 1829. so he stands outside on the steps of the capitol. and that begins a tradition from andrew jackson to jimmy carter of presidents of the united states standing on the east front steps of the capitol. if you've been to the capitol, the capitol's primary entrance, it's major stairs are the east front facing to us the supreme court and the library of congress. people think the other side is the front of the capitol. it has no back. because nobody wants an office on the back of the capitol. looking down the mall when is magnificent didn't look anything like that in the 19th century that whole west front wasn't established. so naug races were done on the east front. but that involved building a platform. because it got bigger and bigger because you were accommodating more and more people. in the 20th century you had to accommodate all the media and everybody else. so they not only built a platform for the president to take his oath on, but they had to build a huge platform across from it for the media. and it got so big in fact that anybody who wanted to see the inauguration couldn't stand behind it because it blocked your view. you had to stand on the side to see. they had to start building this in september before the election and that took up all the parking places. in those days members of congress used to park out there. they didn't like the idea they lost their parking places from september to january. the joint commilt tee on the inauguration which hosts the inauguration decided to move the inauguration in 1981 to the west front of the capitol. and this creates one of the great miths about inaugurations. and i guarantee you will read it in at least one newspaper out leth at some point during this inauguration. and somebody is going to say the inauguration was held on the west front of the capitol because since ronald reagan was president because he was a man of the west he wanted to face to the west as president. and he picked that side. now the problem with this is that the joint committee on the inauguration picked that site in june of 1980 and ronald reagan was nominated by his party until july 1980. the platform was under construction by the time the election was held in november. if jimmy carter had been re-elected he would have been sworn in on the west front. but ronald reagan was ronald reagan was smart enough to realize that he could take possession of this even though he did not order of this or choose this, he put it into his inaugural address. i am the first president to be looking west. i am looking out towards the pacific. he took ownership of that move from the east front to the west front even though he was not the person to choose it. this is an important lesson. ever since george washington came to the capital, congress has won the inaugural -- has run the inaugurations. that part is -- has been done by the congress. they start a year in advance, long before they know who is going to be nominated or elected. they start to make the plans, they pick a theme for the inauguration, they build the platform, they print the tickets, they get everything under way so that when somebody is elected in november, they can get everything done between november and january. for long periods in american history, the inauguration was on march 4. in january -- in 1933, the constitution was amended with the 20th amendment which moved the inauguration of up. now congress begins on january 3. the president is sworn in on january 25. -- 25th. -- 20th. usually, the joint committee is chaired by the chairman of the senate rules committee. it is cochaired by the speaker and it is done jointly between the two houses. traditionally, the senate has taken the lead and is quite a bit of that. they work with the staff of about 14 people. they have been dealing with this over the last year. there is a second inaugural committee and that is when somebody is elected president, the first thing they have to do is appoint their own inaugural committee. after the president leaves the congress, everything is taken over by the president's committee. they're in charge of the parade, they have a staff of 107 people. how come the congress is working with such a small staff and the president is working with such a large staff? everything we do with the capital is paid by the government. once the president leaves, his committee has to pay for everything. they pay for all the things related, -- all the things related to the parade and to the ball. they're raising the funds for private -- to try to underwrite what is going on. i mentioned the ronald reagan gets a lot of credit for moving the inauguration when he did not move the inauguration. but he did move the inauguration four years later. that was in 1985 when the weather was really fall in washington. it was below 7 degrees, it was a bitter cold day. the reagan white house, the night before looking at the forecast, thought it was cruel and unusual punishment to make people sit outside. they called the chairman of the rules committee and chairman of the inaugural committee and they said, we think it should be moved inside to the rotunda. he thought the best thing to do was to call his counterparts and that was tip o'neill and the congressional telephone operator tracked down the speaker in a bar when he was watching a basketball game and he said, the president wants to move his inauguration and the speaker said, it is his inauguration he should have a where he wants it. and they moved it inside. even though there was a desire of people to see this, most people saw on television. in 2009, but we were talking about the inauguration and someone said, if the weather is bad, we will have to move it inside. the architect of the capital asset i would be impeached. -- capital said, i would be impeached. there was a blizzard going on went william howard taft was inaugurated into that -- but they had a completely outside ceremony. it poured rain when herbert hoover wrote down from the white house to the capital, but they rode in an open car. a lot of inauguration's -- john f. kennedy had a blizzard the night before his inauguration. students from local university came down to shovel snow. anytime you talk to anybody who went to kennedy's inauguration, the first thing i talk about is the weather. it is the one thing that we cannot predict. we have this situation with the president being sworn in, but what about the vice president? it used to be there was a tradition that the vice president at his own inauguration. when the congress and the presidency is to begin their terms on march 4, the first thing that happened was that the senate and house would need to swear in their new members. the first thing they had to do was wherein their vice- president, who is the president of the senate. for a long time, a century, presidents of the united states used to go to the senate chamber to watch their vice-president be sworn in. the senate is to give the vice president a chance to deliver his own address. can you a bijan vice president by been given -- can you would imagine vice president died in getting the opportunity -- a vice president biden getting the opportunity to give his own address? his vice president was andrew johnson, who was the only -- who became the war governor of tennessee. poor johnson arrived at the capitol suffering from the flu. a helpful senate clerk poured him a shot of whiskey. and then another. and then another. he gave them a quick -- a completely inebriated inaugural address. lincoln was mortified. i unfortunately for johnson, it sets a public image of the andrew johnson. another burly disastrous vice- presidential inaugural address was calvin coolidge as vice- president. he used his address to tell the senate how they should operate. it set him off on a bad -- starting in 1937, that is when the congress started before the president. now president and vice presidents are sworn outside on the steps. the vice president lost his chance to give an inaugural address. there was one exception in that long tradition of the inauguration speech tell that the capital. that was in 1945 when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. franklin roosevelt, his third inauguration was done at the capitol, but his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this was not the inopportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. he decided on his own to move the inauguration to the south front of the capital. the joint committee was not happy with that decision. the president of the united states can decide above and beyond the date and the time everything else is tradition and can be changed. we reverted back to holding inaugurations at the capitol. we moved them from the east front to the west front and the crowd has been getting bigger and bigger. one reason on the west front is that you can accommodate more people. if you look at the photographs of the last several inauguration's, you can measure the crowd by how far it goes back. when ronald reagan was sworn in, the crowds went back to a block beyond the reflecting pool. with each inauguration, at the crowd gets a little bit further back. until 2009. there were so many people, they went all the way back to the washington monument. there were least 1.5 million people crowded onto the mall. one of the coldest days in washington. yet it was a nice atmosphere on the mall. but the most remarkable things, but there was not a single arrest made that entire day of anybody involved in the inaugural proceedings. they do need to have a lot of medical assistance because people standing outside for that long, there is always somebody was going to collapse. they bring in trailers with doctors and nurses to be able to treat. despite the fact that we have increased security, it was a very peaceful day. not everybody always agrees with an inauguration. there are always dissenters. the secret service and police reserve spaces outside along the parade route for groups that they called the first amendment groups. you have the right to peacefully demonstrate and to -- to speak out and to assemble. i can recall some inaugurations during the vietnam war where there were demonstrations and protests regardless of what the assigned areas were along the way. everybody, from the president to his opponents, everybody sees some importance and the ceremonies involved. the other change that has happened, by the way, is that more people get to see it who are not in washington. in the 19th century, you read about it in the newspaper. starting in the 1920's, you could listen on the radio. starting in the 1940's, you could watch it on television. now it is web cast around the world. the audience for the inauguration is enormous. that is an important moment for the president because it is his moment to speak to the entire country and to the entire world. inaugural addresses tend to be more eloquent and they tend not to be as specific as state of the union message. the state of the union message is a laundry list. i would like this, this, at this from you. lincoln's was carved on the wall of his monument. john f. kennedy's is particularly memorable. another -- other addresses have not risen to that level. and then the question comes about second inaugurations. the big excitement is for the first inauguration. been why should they do it? why do we need all this ceremony? we should go back to thomas jefferson. it is still an important moment. if you looked at recent history, less than half of our presidents have the opportunity to have the second inauguration. the ones who do often have a clearer sense of what it is they want to accomplish. when they're coming into office, they want everybody to love them. after four years, there may -- they have a much better sense of what their administration is about. the link in its first installment -- inauguration, he is begging people not to fight this war. the second inauguration, have begun to heal the nation? -- how are we going to appeal the nation? and other second inauguration that is memorable as franklin roosevelt bird in 1933, franklin roosevelt did not know what the new deal was going to do. by 1937, franklin roosevelt knew what the new deal was about. his second inaugural address was much more specific. one-third of the nation still ill fed and ill closed. the mission needed to be continued. second inaugurations are much more pointed as far as the president is concerned. what should you look for on this inauguration. it is going to be a coming together. it is going to be the legislative branch hosting the executive branch. large numbers of the diplomatic corps will be up on the platform. huge numbers of the public will be there to see what is going on. the fact that congress continues to hold these inaugurations is a sign of this coming back together. national unity, this moment of national unity and we suspend all of the political fight and we swear in this person who is going to lead desk for the next four years. -- lead us for the next four years. i never like to predict the future. the only thing i can say, i will live civilly project that tomorrow -- monday's inaugural address will end the way i will end right now, which is thank you, god bless you, and god bless america. [applause] i have been asked to open the floor up for questions. >> i am a history major. i was wondering as a historian, how do feel when politicians misinterpret the philosophies of the founding fathers? what do think the founding fathers would think of the government today? >> everybody seems to think they know exactly what james madison had in mind. thomas jefferson was not at the constitutional convention. he felt left out of that. we have a lot of people who were convinced. even the founding fathers were not absolutely certain. there are a lot of things in the constitution that came about as compromises. it bothers me a bit when everybody says, this is what the founding fathers meant. we historians are not certain what the founding fathers meant. we have to make a good-faith effort. we go to the federalist papers and their diaries. u.s. about what they would think about the government today -- you ask about what they would think about the government today. they would be surprised at about how much the government still resembles the government drafted. the u.s. senate has every power that was given to a by the constitution in 1789. almost every other government in the world has taken power away from the upper house. the u.s. senate and the u.s. house retain exactly the powers they had. the presidency has grown, but they thought the presidency needed to be a strong institution. that is the reason they rallied behind george washington. what would astonish them is not the functions of the government, it is the size of the government. and the size of the country. i think it would take away their breath. there would be astonished at the salaries. i think they would go back, noting that our constitution's has only been amended 27 times 11 of those amendments for by the very first congress. >> thank you for coming here today. hideous think -- the jcc or the pic? >> i am more loyal to the jcc. we call them the breadth of the in committee. they go away and they reappear every four years. they began a year in advance and then they start working their way through this process. i have been to a lot of the joint meetings. it is like planning the day -- d-day. it is a phenomenal practice and they do really well. to give credit to the president's committee, they do not have anywhere near as much time. they hit the ground running. people who are running the second inauguration are the same people who ran his first. they know the ropes. it will be hard for the next president who comes again. the one thing they all find in the end is that there is an enormous demand for tickets. the matter how many tickets you print, there is greater demand beyond that. trying to satisfy the needs of all the people there. they have tried to accommodate the crowds by putting them very large screens along the mall and sound system so that you can see and hear things. they promise to be a -- an adequate number of porta-potti es. >> my name is tyler from the university of san diego. how was this inauguration going to be different from the first inauguration? what can we expect to hear from you -- hear from him during his address? >> it will not be as dead. they count the number -- it will not be as big. it is not running anywhere near as big as it was four years ago. that is part from -- for the course for second inaugurations. they do expect the crowd will be larger than the average crowd. it will be very hard to me that 1.5 million from before that. for what the president says, my suspicion is that to the second time around, at president has a much better sense of what they can do a much want to do. i suspect this will be much more specific goals as to where he wants to lead us. it will be interesting to see what he has to say. i have not spoken to his speech writers. >> my name is kimberly. i am interested and knowing and hearing about what you think the most significant development is in the history of the inaugurations. >> the media developments, the fact that inaugurations are now so internationally broadcast is really the most important part of how they have changed over time. when you think about -- everybody wanted to see george washington, but there were not that many people who could get to new york. even andrew jackson, by the time you get to railroads, people were shocked by the large number of people who came to see enter jackson. -- to see andrew jackson. you can watch this worldwide, you can sit at your computer. that is the most significant change. >> i had the pleasure of meeting you on the senate floor when i took a trip. ever since that day, i've had the same question going on in my mind. he came out with a book defending the filibuster. we wanted to know how exactly you feel on the filibuster because throughout all of our experiences, we've only heard by the filibuster should no longer be used. >> it is interesting. there is the division between the look -- political scientists and historians. what is wrong with it and how can be fixed? the job of the historian is to let the system and say, how did it this way? we tend to be a little bit more tolerant and less active in suggesting changes. i did an oral history with a former parliamentarian and he said the rules of this and are perfect. if they change every one of them, at the rules of the senate will be perfect. the senators have exclusive control of for writing their own rules. if they want to change them, they will change into effect whenever their circumstances are. the senate is a frustrating and cumbersome organization. it has been that way since 1789. one of the first senators complained that somebody was trying to talk a bill to death. it is a tactic that has developed. the constitution said each house can write their own rules. the house is a very big body and to get any kind of control, they had to write the rules so that the majority can prevail. as long as the majority sticks together, they did not have to talk to the minority, and they usually do not. you come to the senate and the rules of the senate had given much more muscle to the minority. sometimes is the minority party and sometimes it is the minority faction and sometimes it is one single senator. that has created some balance between these two bodies. it is easier if you are a strong majority leader and a strong speaker in the house to ramrod or program. every senator majority leader is under a lot of burden to get this uncooperative organization to work together. take a look at this last congress. because of the -- they have to forge bipartisan compromises. and so they did, the senate was able to pass a farm bill, a highway bill, a post office bill, and fiscal cliff. and the house, which is supposed to be able to operate more efficiently, they did not pass any of those things. only's the fiscal cliff because the speaker said, everybody can vote on it. the reason is because they have majority rule, people look on as a sign of weakness if the speaker of the house has to go to the minorities parties for support. the farm bill did not pass, the housing bill did not pass. even though those are generally supported and people are waiting for the farm bill to pass. this filibuster did not create the budget gridlock. i am not sure. there are a lot of things that the centers are going to try to work out. -- senator is are going to try to work out. they will see some modifications. i do not think they will be hugely drastic. i do not think the filibuster is going to go away. they will try to get over some of the speed bumps in the process. you have a terrific professor. his interview is on the senate website. >> i endangering in politics. my question today is, -- i am majoring in politics. is it reasonable to believe president obama as a second term will be similar to his first even though the same crisis still exists? >> the one thing you can say about a second terms is that they're full of things that are totally unprotected. -- predicted. you would think about point that he was completely in charge. the first thing he did was to ask for increasing the size of the supreme court. that divided the democratic party. he got much less support from congress during his second term. and then the war started. none of that could have been predicted the moment he took the oath of office. richard nixon took the oath of office after winning a huge victory in 1972. in 1973, he was on top of the world. a year and a half later, he was resigning. a lot of things you cannot predict that will happen. it is how will a president can respond. you hope that presidents are much more control of what is going on and they can respond quickly. the circumstances are going to be beyond their knowledge at this stage of the game. i'm afraid i cannot predict. second terms have not been productive as first terms. ever since the 20th amendment, the present cannot run again. he can put his support behind put his support behind somebody, and that will presumably be a strength. but politicians and members of congress are all calculating on that. the president is not going to be on the ballot with than the next time around. it remains to be seen, in other words. >> i study economics and marketing. with the change in time and the change in culture, i feel that we view the inaugural address as a grand media spectacle instead of focusing on the credibility of the oath taken by the president. do you see it as a spectacle out? people coming and having fun there? or is it taken seriously? >> thomas jefferson trying to make it not a spectacle, but it has always been that way from the beginning. there is a point in any civic life where you need have spectacle. the person that understood that was ronald reagan. he spent his career in hollywood and he had a sense of showmanship along the way. the first time i saw him was on the steps of the capital in 1980 when he came to film a television commercials for the republican candidates for congress. and he was the only one that remain in character, paying attention to the speaker troubled bank. everyone else reverted to their normal state. this guy will be tough to beat. as i said, he took possession of his inaugural by being the first one on the west front. it is a huge amount of spectacle in celebration that worked really hard for the president as a candidate. but what did the president actually say during the inauguration? the other thing history remembers is what the weather was like that day. and they are looking for a moment in the weather. i can't imagine how many i have read without dark and gray was, but just as the president began to speak, a ray of light came through indicating there was a vote for the future. we are looking for a hope for the future for the next four years. there is substance to it, but there is a lot of partying that goes a long as well. >> i would like to ask a question regarding legacy. you mentioned and jackson was a man of the people. given the great deal of support that president obama had received in the 2009 inauguration, what will we expect to hear from him that might define or establish his legacy on monday? >> a very good point, residents of the united states can't campaign again, but they campaign for history. they get very conscious of their role in history, what will they be remembered for? it is interesting, the president that either did not get a second term or whose second term was considered disastrous often wind up campaigning even harder. some of our presidents have been great ex-president, working hard to establish that kind of historical legacy. i think president obama will use that opportunity to try to find what it is and how you want people to think of them not just now, but in the future. and king has just had a monument built to him. 50 years ago, 1963, king gave his speech on the steps of the lincoln memorial. there will be some connection to that in the process because this is the fulfillment of what he looked for. but what is left, what needs to be done? it is part of the president goes the thinking. .- the president's thinking we always get king's birthday off and the presidential inaugural off. have bet on they tuesday? the question is, why didn't we have that on sunday? we never have a formal outdoor ceremony on sunday. the sense is that presidents will be sworn in privately on sunday but the ceremony is held on monday. it is a wonderful coincidence that he is being -- it is being held on martin luther king's birthday. >> we have had speakers talk about the current polarization of congress. i am interested to know, what do you think about the polarization of congress? how can we bridge the gap going forward? >> i think one of the reasons it is polarized is that the political parties have changed dramatically in the last 30 years. in 1976, both parties were internally divided. each party had a liberal and conservative wing. you had some republicans that are more liberal than most of the democrats. every vote was bipartisan because they voted to try to get people in the middle to swing their way back and forth. political scientists think it is terrible. it should be more like parliamentary parties. i would say be where what you ask for because you will actually get it. both political parties have become much more internally cohesive and they're much more like parliamentary parties right now. the reason for this is the southern states migrated from the democratic party to the republican party. that made the republican party more conservative than the democratic party more liberal. the party leaders worked very hard to keep their conferences together. that means there is less middle ground to a pullover. in those governments, the parties face each other and they yell at each other. they're quite rude to each other. we don't expect that from the u.s. congress. they have not evolved to meet this sort of situation so we have to face the new reality. much of the polarization is the external because of the people that get elected. >> my question to you, we are a nation separated with church and state. what are your thoughts of the bible and using the word god and history? >> not only did washington have a bible, we still use his bible for some inaugurations. but after his inauguration, the congress voted to have a church service and then went across to the chapel. there was argument because not everybody was episcopalian but they went ahead and went to it. would that be a violation of the first amendment? there wasn't a first amendment until 1889. it was what he and his colleagues felt was appropriate on this occasion. presidents choose what to do in since franklin roosevelt, presidents have usually gone to a church service before their inauguration and it is personal to them. members of congress will choose either a family bible or historical level. -- bible. there was thomas jefferson's copy of the kuran. hindus were sworn in in congress. so help me god is another issue. there is probably no problem with the president saying that, but was the chief justice? i am sure every president would say that regardless of what the chief justice had to say. >> i attended miami dade college. what led you to be head historian and what is your favorite part about being one? >> i became a historian because i like political history. it is something i stumbled into, i was writing a biography of a man and discovered to my surprise that he had done a very long oral history, 700 pages. the person i was writing about had been dead for 10 years and he had been telling me about his childhood, his life, and he left out any mention of his family. either his wife for the messy divorce. he did not mention his children or the income tax cases. i was able to verify pretty much everything he had said, but i needed to know more. they started interviewing his widow, his children, the person that prosecuted him, and i got to interview his psychiatrist. it changed the nature of my research and made my book much more interesting. the senate created the historic office in 1975. i have been doing oral history since the senate staff in 1976. explaining the arcane rules of the senate, sitting down with staff directors. and you can evaluate the various centers, i recently interviewed a man that spent 22 years as a staff member. asking which was harder. been chief of staff was much harder because you wake up worrying about things. i had a chief of staff that was doing that for me. and being able to put it out, which is a throw to me when i see a historian citing. we used a lot of interviews and i get a great sense of pride at any time i come across in ". i am glad it is there for people to use. [applause] >> the word encyclopedic does not do justice to don ritchie's knowledge of the senator or constitutional history in general. we are delighted to have you, we will take a five minute break. really, five minutes. >> i, barack hussein obama do solemnly swear -- >> this weekend, the inauguration as president obama begins his second term. the official swearing-in ceremony before noon on eastern. it begins with a look back on the 2009 inaugural address. and monday, the public inaugural ceremony staring at the u.s. capitol. in live coverage begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. and throughout the day, join the conversation by phone, or facebook or twitter. >> as the inauguration coverage gets ready to kick off, we get a look back at inaugural history and a look at the memorial right off of the national mall near the lincoln memorial where dr. king delivered his i have a dream speech. locals and students and visitors, c-span cameras are at one of the locations. the number of reports an estimated crowd in town of about 600,000. the secene today, dr. king's image carved into teh stone of hope out of the mountain of despair. president obama will be resting his hand on to bibles. the one belonging to president abraham lincoln and one that reverend king used on the road for inspiration and preparing services. earlier this week, representatives from the inaugural committee, the joint congressional committee and the u.s. capitol police held a news conference about the inauguration day preparation. they talked at the national press club for about 50 minutes. >> thank you. thank you very much. and thank you press club, for hosting us today. this is going to be a little bit of a dance. there is a lot of different players that are involved in the events that will be taking place over the next few days. my name is brent colburn. i'm the communications director for the presidential inaugural committee. and we are involved in this weekend, doing a lot of the public events that fall outside the official swearing-in, which matt can talk to. in fact, as i kind of think about this, it may make sense to do this in sections. matt, if you want to walk on this. the three main groups that really put this together is the pick and we represent the president and vice president's equities in there. we are a governmental organization that is set up every four years to represent the president and vice president's views. we worked with the j.t.f. on the parade and the official inaugural ball and some of the other events that you will hear about, the national prayer service and the kids' concerts. and official swearing-in pieces and j.t.f. which does the military piece of this the colonel will talk about from a support stand point. and thank you to our law enforcement partners who are represented by the d.c. police department today. and there is a huge law enforcement presence to keep us safe over the next four, five days. matt, do you want to talk about what you guys will be doing. >> good morning everybody. miami matt house, i'm the press secretary for the joint congressional committee on inaugural ceremonies. our purview is primarily everything happening on capitol hill. staff has been involved in planning our activities for a year. the inauguration preparations begin the minute the previous one ends. the rules committee in the senate has been hard at work preparing for monday and i wanted to talk very briefly about our theme for monday and walk through some of the components very briefly and i'm happy to answer additional questions at the end. the theme for this year is faith in america's future. a theme that was selected by chairman schumer and spent a lot of time talking about it. this marks the 150th year since the completion of the capitol dome with the statue of freedom being placed on the top. the project began in the 1850's and stopped midway through when the civil war broke out. and there was a question among congress and the president as to whether we could fight a civil war and finish the dome. president lincoln said if people see the capitol going on, it's a sign that we intend, the union shall go on. congress came together and were able to complete the capitol dome in the midst of the civil war and senator schumer selected this theme knowing that we have challenges that we face as a country now. but if you look back what we accomplished 150 years, we can find faith in america's future and overcome obstacles. these are the remarks throughout the day and in some of the program material to folks who will be seeing the ceremonies and you will see in various elements throughout the program. the day for our committee really begins at 9:00 when the members head to the white house for a coffee and tea with the president. senator mcconnell joins that group. from there, there is coffee with the president, vice president, the first lady and dr. biden as well. everyone begins to make their way back to the capitol at 10, 10:30, depending on how the coffee and tea proceeds. our members come and they are there and get ahead of the president. they'll greet the president and senator schumer as they come in on the senate side of the capitol at 10:40 and everyone goes into the capitol and we start the proceedings out with dignitaries, and it begins at 11:00. it proceeds for 30 minutes when the president is introduced out onto the platform. senator schumer opens the ceremonies with a few remarks and brent will talk about how the program proceeds from there. from folks coming to the mall to watch the ceremony or the ticketted area, we will be opening the doors at 7:00 a.m. and advised everyone to make sure they are there by 9:30 to make sure there is time for screening and everyone can get flew to their ticketed place in time to see the festivities. we have a number of crowd management strategies to improve on of the systems that were in place last time because of the issues people experienced trying to get into the ceremonies. we have planned for many, many months for crowds of all sizes. we think we have a great system in place to make sure everyone who has a ticket or coming to the nonticketed area on the mall can see the ceremonies. i will go into that during the question and answer session. >> thank you, matt. just to complete a little bit what the monday portion will look like at the capitol. senator schumer will welcome us as the chair and we will begin a run of show, if you will, for the inauguration day for the ceremonial swearing-in. vice president biden will administer the oath of office. the first latino justice to do a swearing-in for a president or vice president and fourth woman. and that will be done on the biden family bible, same one used by vice president biden four years ago and used throughout his swearings-in as senator. james taylor will sing "america, the beautiful" and president obama will be administered the oath of office. it is done by supreme court justice john roberts and two bibles used this time. first is the lincoln bible, this was used by the president four years ago and same bible used by president lincoln when he was sworn in for the first time in 1861 and that will be on top of the king family bible which has been provided for this ceremony by the king family. kelly clarkson will sing "my country tis of thee" and there will be a poem read. we are excited that richard bla nmp co will be -- blanco will be joining us. reverend louis leon will be overseeing the traditional st. john's service that kicks off the president's day on mopped and will be offering the prayer and beyonce will be singing the national anthem. these historic bibles, and they are symbolic bibles as we head into the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation and with that, i would like to hand it over to our partners and talk about the inaugural parade, which will take place after the lunch that matt discussed. >> thank you. i'm colonel michelle roberts. and our task force has the responsibility for planning and coordinating all of the military ceremonial support for the inaugural activities. once the luncheon is complete, the president and the first lady, the vice president and the second lady will be escorted out to the east front of the capitol, where they will be greeted by the commander of the task force and he will escort them down the steps to take the review. and the review is presidential escort unit which is comprised of approximately 380 service members. followed by each of the service honor guards and the u.s. army band as well as the marine corps band. and they will go past the president's location on the steps on the east front of the capitol. and once they complete the pass and review. then the presidential escort, they fall into the motorcade and they start the parade route. along the parade route, we have approximately 2,300 military personnel participating in the parade. approximately 10,000 total personnel in the parade. and the way the parade is organized, there are five divisions in this parade. each division is led by a service component. so division one will be led by the army. division two, by the marines. division three by the navy. division four by the air force. and division five by a mixture of the coast guard and merchant marines. and essentially, it's comprised of military bands. service elements that represent the active reserve and national guard components and followed by the civilian groups that have applied to be in the parade. along the entire parade route is the military cordon. that is comprised of 1,500 service members from all services. for the activities at the capitol, we have approximately 800 military service members there performing various functions from the presidential escort to bands, to the herald trumpets, the presidential salute battery, usual shears and military -- ushers and military assistants. >> what branch of the service are you in? >> i'm army. >> colonel roberts did not give the j.t.f. credit for the work they do. it's not just the parade piece. there are people that work on this inaugural weekend for months and some cases up to a year beforehand preparing for whomever is elected in november and someone who participated in the inaugural for president obama four years ago and we had no idea what we were doing, i can tell you the folks, regardless of who the chair is and the folks at j.t.f. are there ready for you when you walk in the door and do the logistical lift. we make sure the president's imprint is put on one of these events. in the parade as the colonel mentioned along with all of these military elements, there are 58 different groups. 58 different groups, floats and vehicles. these are from all 50 states. they are everything from the virginia military institute just across the river in virginia, down in southern virginia, which has marched in a number of inaugural parades through a group of maine of unicyclists, which are called the jim dandies. they will pass review in front of the white house. the president will stand and watch the entire review and enjoy the parade along with thousands of folks who will come down and be watching from along the parade route. once that ends, the president goes inside and the official part of his day is done. and he gets ready for the inaugural balls. as you have seen and reported, there are two inaugural balls this time. the first is the commander in chief's ball. it is a tradition that was started by george bush that we have continued. and chance for us to honor our partners in the military. and i know j.t.f. has been included in the selection process for the individuals that will be attending. mostly enlisted personnel from all the branches. and then second larger inaugural ball. i will be happy to answer questions about that inaugural ball as we get into the question and answer portion. before we go into the saturday events, i want to invite our partners from capitol police, security not just for monday but the entire weekend of activities. >> good morning everyone. my name is officer antrobus. i'm the public information officer for the united states capitol police. i will repeat it. my title is public and information -- public information officer. i am an officer. no worries. the united states capitol police, our responsibility in conjunction with our law enforcement partners is to ensure the safety of those attending the inaugural ceremonies throughout the weekend. we want everyone to enjoy the democratic process and this historic day. with any of that that occurs, safety is our number one priority. safety and security for potus, ists, etc. -- guests, etc., not carried out just by us. the partnership we have established to create a robust, multifaceted security plan has been in the works for many months. while i cannot go into detail security plan, please know we have trained extensively to address any issues during the day. questi>> thank you, officer. i appreciate that. as someone who did securities and communications, i can tell you that, during the q&a, the officer has the easiest job. he gets to say i cannot tell you that. that her day is a big day for us. two traditions were started in 2009 by the first family, the national day of service and the kids' art girl concert. -- inaugural concert. chelsea clinton has joined us this year as the honorary cochair of the day of service. she will be appearing at the mall event. it is in the incredibly large tent. she will be joined by a number of celebrities, including efvva langoria, ben folds, as well as 100 organizations from across the capital region that do service. folks will be able to go down and talk to these people. it is a fair-type atmosphere. we will have events in all 50 states. we are on track for over 2000 events across the country. this is the first inaugural committee that has paid for staff and all 50 states are it this is a priorit. this is a priority for the first family. once we wrap up on the mall come a there is one event on saturday evening, the kids' darker oh children's concert -- inaugural children's concert. it is extension of the work they have done with the armed forces initiative. this will take place at the convention center. we are going to be announcing details on talent in the coming days. we put out an initial list of talent that will be appearing at either both the balls or one or the other. as you can imagine, this is a logistical list. over half of the audience will be made up of military kids. this is a great place to honor the sacrifice of the men and women who serve and the families that support them. on tuesday -- i am jumping ahead of what we just discussed -- will also be the traditional prayer service taking place at the national cathedral. the first and second family will attend. this is a tradition that is part of most inaugurals. we are still working with the cathedral on who will be there. the president will attend. it will be a nice way to off the four days -- to cap off the four days. i am sure you all have a number of questions. i am making sure i did not miss anything. i think that is about it. i am more than happy to open it up to questions. i would be remiss if i did not say thank you to all of our partners, as well as our law enforcement partners who have done a fantastic job. >> one item of housekeeping before we go to q&a. if i recognize you to ask a question, if you could identify your name and news organization. we will try to get to you as many as we can. as >> nbc news. we are a little more concerned with media. can we expect improvement on that front? >> short. -- sure. we will be issuing media guidelines in the next day or so that will make clear the movements that we have been planning for many months to accommodate all of the individuals who are credentialed for the event. everyone should be on the same page as far as where folks can and cannot go. we are also making accommodations to folks who are interested in broadcasting from the capital on sunday. i think we have got a good plan in place. >> if i could add to that, we do have the advantage of having done this metro years ago from the presidential inaugural committee side. a lot of the steps we took were trying to learn from the challenges last time. one of the reasons we consolidated the two balls into the convention center, when archer years ago they were spread out over five locations, is to try to make this a logistically more manageable process. our hope is to flow in and out of the official ceremony and the other events will be smooth. jason put out a great online tool for the public -- i think they announced earlier this week. it is a mobile web app that matter= and speak more to. it is part of our effort to make sure people across the country can be involved in this event. we will have live streaming of the event. we will also have logistical information for people who are attending. we are between those schools and using twitter and real-time social media tools to make this as smooth a process as possible. we also put a plug in for ttjts. i think we have seen a big leap forward in our reader you're using -- and how we are using media. >> i was wondering if any of you can address what the cost is for all of the preparations. in addition to the hispanic people involved, and any other hispanic celebrities or national leaders that will be joining the ?elebration quest to ma >> i will defer on the cost issue. there are a number of groups and entities that go into this, so ascertaining a caustic is tough. a lot of these are moving budgets. i would be able to speak to it more after the event occurs. in terms of the hispanic community involvement, the president is committed to making sure that this is an event that reflects america. you will see in the parade a number of groups among not just from the hispanic community, but from other communities across this country. we can get that full list of participants to you. that really show the diversity of cultures and communities that make up his country. the inaugural poet, for the first time, will be a spanish- american. a cuban-american. you will see a number of leaders attending -- eva lan goria. she was a big support of the president's during the campaign. it really does reflect the country. >> i want to add one thing. as far as latino participation in the official festivities, senator schumer invited the reverend anlouis cortez. he has done a tremendous amount to fight crime and poverty and make sure individuals across the country have access to quality education. he will open the luncheon with a prayer in recognition of his long history of service. >> really quick. this does not speak specifically to the spanish-american community, but in shoveling my notes, i did miss the fact we wanted to make sure everyone knew that the vers -- thiseveredgar e looks forward as well as to where the president wants president wants to take us as a country. >> i want to know how many foreign dignitaries will be coming and if there is a list for where they are sitting. >> we are still finalizing the a list. we will have more information in the coming days. traditionally, the diplomatic corps has been seated on the platform. there are about 15 guest seated on the platform, including the president, the vice president, and his family and guests. governors, the house and senate, the supreme court, joint chiefs, and the diplomatic corps will be there. normally about 150, but we will have more details in the coming days. >> the question is for mr. coburn. there have been questions raised about the transparency of your committee in regards to the donor-related information that has not been released. according totee, according regulations, as to file 90 days after the inauguration. we are providing donors on a weekly basis. the names of those who have given to the committee. we believe this is a step above and beyond the transparency regulations place down. we encourage people to go to our website. >> i said at the beginning that i do not want follow-up questions. we want to give everyone a chance. >> chicago tribune. following up on the donors, where are you at today? >> we have not been discussing the goal publicly, but we are on track to meet it. we have every comfort we will have the resources we need to put on all of the the vents we discussed. i am not going to get into specific numbers. >> you have not told us anything about the president's day on sunday. what will he do for the day of service? >> i can answer "i do not know those quote to a number of " who a number of those. this is a schedule that is more driven by the white house. when inauguration day falls on a sunday -- this is the seventh time it has happened -- traditionally the public or ceremonial piece is on monday. according to the constitution, he has to be sworn in on january 20 by noon. there'll be a small private ceremony of the white house, just immediate family. it will be available for the american people to see. it will be in the blue room. the president will walk in. chief justice roberts will be there to administer the oath. he will be using the robinerts family bible. it will be a quick, official, but important ceremony. the vice president will do the same thing earlier that day. they are doing it that way because of scheduling. that will be at the vice president's residence, again, with the immediate family. he will be sworn in on the biden-family bible. the same one they used four years ago. in between those two, they will be doing a replaying of arlington. as will be different from the replayings they are used to seeing the president and vice president to on veterans day. it is similar to the one we did four years ago. it will be the two of them marking the importance of those who have served this country and given their lives. those are the only thing i know of on schedule for sunday. sorry, i should have mentioned that. both the biden's and obamas wil participate saturday in a service activity. we will be making announcements on that in the coming days. odds are you will know when it happens, but they will be doing something, and that will be the entire family. >> a follow-up on the fundraising question. if you do have less ovftover fu, where do you plan to use those funds question mark >> i do not know. i know there are rules that regulate what we can and cannot do with those funds. in the past, some funds were used to do repairs -- repairs on the national mall. that is a bridge we will cross when we come to it. there are a number of civic-minded things we can do. >> cnn. how many law-enforcement agencies and offices will be involved in security security on the day of the inauguration? and how large of an area will be closed off? >> i want to apologize for saying it was morning when it was actually afternoon. we cannot go into detail as far as how many law enforcement officers will be present for the inauguration. could you repeat your second question question m? >> how large of an area will be closed off question mark >> i can touch base with you afterwards to provide those. >> [indiscernible]>> with all of vents that happen on the capitol complex, we trained constantly to address them. as far as specific threat, i cannot answer that. just know that the united states capital lease, with our law enforcement parsing the -- law enforcement partners, have trained for issue any issues tht might come up. >> two logistical questions. there are credentials for roaming outside of the mall on the capital area. what does nothat get you that te public cannot get question mar? and does everyone have to go around the capital and the lincoln memorial again? >> this will not be a satisfying answer, but we will get back to you want details. we have an entire team that just concentrates on media logistics. i know they have been working on that. that was an issue four years ago. some of my colleagues can follow up afterwards. what is your best guess for the running time of the ceremony, start to finish? and the parade? >> i can handle the ceremony portion. we expect the announcement on the platform from the former presidents will begin around 11:00. this will take about 30 minutes. senator schumer opens the ceremony at 11:30. we expect the president will take the oath around noon. the final musical acts. the procession will head back inside about 12:30. music begins for the pre-program at nine: 30 in the morning. -- 9:30 in the morning. >> [indiscernible]>> of course. after the inaugural speech and the performances, the president would have beckoned. -- will head back in. >> i love the idea of any show that opens or closes with beyoncÉ. [laughter]the parade -- it is more traditional sized. are prayed four years ago was long -- our parade four years ago was long. these things can change based on whether, other events. this parade is a little different than what you might .ee at an the macy's day parade this is a moving parade that will move through the an old ti. this is important for planning purposes for media who may be covering it. there are escorts that go with the limos down pennsylvania avenue to the white house. there is a short break before the parade begins. it is about 20 minutes. this is so those individuals can go inside quickly and come back out and be positioned before the first elements of the military and civilian units. >> you can probably speak to that best. >> for all the participants in the parade, with approximately 10,000 participants, it is a huge logistical dance that happens. primarily, staging is going to happen at the pentagon parking lot. they will go through secret service screening and security screens, get everybody lined up in the proper formation so that the five divisions are clear, everybody in the correct order. then there are logistical teams assigned to each division that are tasked with making sure they start at the proper time, get on the right route. once they get past the viewing stand, there are areas designated for each of the elements in the parade so they can get past ant and dispersed. >> [indiscernible]and best guess for start of the parade is 2:30 ?uestion ma >> yes. >> i was wondering if you could speak about whether plans, contingency plans, if you wake up and there is snow on the ground in the morning. >> we do have a weather conditions he -- whether contingency land. ceremonies will be moved inside. that is a decision that the joint committee, in consultation with the presidential inaugural committee, would make sunday afternoon so everyone has time to adjust. >> i would add to that that our goal is to have this event go forward. that being said, we are not going to put anyone in harm's way. the real driver in that som decision-making process will be public safety. we will deal with that as it comes up. each element of this outside of the actual swearing in really are just traditions that are important to the president, the first family, the country, to show what our transition of democracy is all about. our hope is to be able to move forward with as many of these events as possible, regardless of the weather. >> on the fund-raising issue, why the reversal from four years ago with more transparency about each donor? george w. bush gave the amount of each donor ahead of time. what decision was made to change that? request?he donors' west >> my understanding is that each one of these is created a new every four years. they are not continuations of the same committee from four years ago. this was just the decision that was made in this instance in terms of disclosure. given the fact that there is the requirement this all the public, it was our attempt to go above and beyond that and at a level of transparency. >> over the weekend and on monday, are their telephone numbers we can call if we need to check up on something, maybe an arrest or something untoward? who will be available for phone calls? >> one more time. >> phone numbers over the weekend if there is something we need to check up on, who can we call? >> you can probably call me. i am the public information officer for capitol police. [laughter]i will talk to you afterwards. get with me afterwards. i will give that to you. -224-1677. >> as you pick up your credentials, there will be a media guide. it is current as of when it went to print last wednesday. we are still slaves to some things in the digital age. there'll also be an online version of that. 2013pic.org. much like the other large national event, like the super bowl or other events the secret service communicates with local and federal police department, there will be a joint information center set up. most of that information should be in that media guide. i have gotten a number of questions about when the media guide will be available. we anticipate the guide will be published later today or first . the timeline for the ceremony itself is always subject to change. we anticipate that and the flow of events and all the details should be public later this afternoon or tomorrow morning. inaugural.senate.gov. >> could it be easier logistically than 2009? >> the short answer is the presidential inaugural committee does not to crowd projections. we do crowd counts after the fact. our expectation is this will be more in line with traditional inaugurals in terms of size of crowd. you tend to get larger crowds when there's changes in power from one party to another. obviously, the president being the first african-american president created a lot of interest. we are very excited about this event. we think there is a lot of enthusiasm. this will be much more along the size and scope of review set inauguration. we hope it will be logistically as smooth as possible. all of the partners oup here at been working very hard to make it as smooth as possible. these are large event. the weather could be cold. i encourage people to dress warm, be prepared to be outside and work with us to make make this as smooth an event as possible. >e> >> in terms of media participation, how many requests for credentials did you receive and how many did you give out? >> i don't have a specific number, but it's thousands. it is one of the most covered events in the world. it has international significance not just national significance. we have thousands of media organizations that apply for credentials. and matt can speak more to the capitol and what they're expecting and we try to accommodate. we want this to be as public an event as possible and an event that people here in the united states and around the world can join as a symbol of what this country is all about. >> "washington post.? there's a lot of interesting tickets made for the parade and the ball. one critic on the hill is saying this can be seen as in-kind work and how many tickets are available for the public. >> i can't give you a specific percentage but can tell you about the universe that make up the ball tickets. certain percentage were given to the general public for purchase. that is unusual and unique to president obama and this inauguration. traditionally there isn't a public sale. we say thank you to folks who have supported the president, that includes staff members, that includes folks that contributed to the president's campaign. but includes volunteers. we worked very hard to make sure that tickets were made available for purchase to thousands of our volunteers to say thank you and have them participate in this event and the commander in chief's ball and i touched on this earlier, this was a tradition started by george w. bush. and president obama thought we should continue and one of his favorite parts of the entire weekend. that will be "travel wise" twice the size last time. and they will be attending free of charge. we wish we had more tickets and would like to include as many people as possible but we have struck a good balance with the size of the event and the size of tickets. >> is there anyone who hasn't asked a question? please. >> i'm wondering about the kids' concerts, half of the awedenens is made up of -- audience is made of up military family. >> some armed forces representatives and i don't have the details handy. make tickets available to d.c. school kids who have worked with the first lady's office. and it is a ticketed event. it will be at the convention center. but it is free of charge to military families and the d.c. school kids. >> on the other ball, the nonmilitary ball, how many people will be attending that and one of your advisers called it open press. what do you mean by open press, because i thought we had to have secret service credentials to cover that. >> our use of open press means that you could have applied for a credential and we give credentials out. and they are given out on a space basis and a full riser just as if the president was giving a speech or campaign event. some of the size, we don't know yet. we will be using as much of the capacity of the convention center as possible. and again, last time we had 10 official balls, this time that is two. we had six that were i believe six that were hosted just at the convention center. so we are doing two in the same space we did six last time. one of the lessons we learned by spreading out our talent, we weren't able to program it in the way we wanted it to. you go to one ball, you see one or two acts. we have a full program throughout the night for all the attendees. both balls, and if you are there, you will get a much richer experience and help us with crowd flow issues. >> these are for credentialed press? >> that's right. everything has to be credentialed for security reasons. >> you made it clear that you need credentials. >> our panel has agreed to stay and answer questions informally after the news conference and on behalf of the national press corps, i want to thank them for coming on a busy week for all these individuals and thank those who joined us at today's press conference. thank you. >> tonight we will show you in not euro speeches from the last six years, starting with ronald reagan's a dress from 1981. though clinton in 1993. white eisenhower in 1957. harry truman, 1940 nine. 1960 nine, richard nixon, then president kennedy in 1961. george w. bush in 19 99. lyndon johnson that from 1965. jimmy carter from 1977. we will wrap up with george w. bush from 2001. starting tonight at 8:00 pm on c-span. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear -- , --[no audio]>> the official swearing ceremony at the white house before noon eastern. our coverage includes your phone calls and a look back at the 2009 presidential inaugural address. the public and inaugural ceremony will be swearing in at noon eastern at the us capitol and other festivities, including the capitol luncheon and parade. live coverage begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. join the conversation by phone, facebook, and on twitter. >> you can see the crews finishing up work between the white house and the capitol getting ready for the inauguration. you can see in front of the white house off of the inaugural parade on monday. some of the finishing touches are going up. there is a presidential seal attached to a heated glassed in area. that is where president obama and michelle obama will watch the parade. the city of washington has spent $6.5 million on inauguration related activities. it is according to the washington business journal and that counts for everything to bottled water to the 2.8 $4 million of the construction of the grandstand we just saw. we will take a look around some of the reparations for the inauguration. [indiscernible] [indiscernible] >> attorney general eric holder talked about the president's plan to reduce gun filings. he was at the us conference of mayors along with the head of tsa and the merits houston texas. -- mayor of houston texas. >> good morning. we will get started. i am the chair of the criminal and social justice committee. i have several -- they may join us in progress. i will allow everyone to introduce yourselves. >> we are on a fairly tight schedule. if you'll give me your name and city and we will go in quickly. >> from davenport, iowa. >> connecticut. >> from university city, missouri. >> hempstead, new york. >> california. >> miami, florida. >> lancaster, pennsylvania. >> mayor of harrisburg, pennsylvania. >> delaware. >> california. >> arlington heights, illinois. >> minnesota. >> south carolina. >> roanoke, virginia. >> seattle, washington. >> we have a co-chaired that is here. thank you for being here. it is an honor to introduce the first speaker, john pistole. he has served in that position when he came to tsa as a veteran of the fbi with extensive counterterrorism experience. he was put in charge of the really expanded counter terrorism program and became the fbi's executive director for counterintelligence. he was named deputy director for the fbi. it is our honor to have you here this morning and we look forward to your comments. please. >> thank you. thank you for the opportunity to be here today to share a few things with you in terms of what tsa does and how that impacts you as mayors of cities. we have a large work force and worked into 450 airports. some of your constituents may be tsa employees. there's a couple things i would like to touch on and see if we have time for questions and comments. one is the reason we do our work. tsa was created
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 8:00pm EST
suspend debt ceiling. until mid may setting the stage for a floor vote as soon as wednesday. they write that the house rules committee posted text of the legislation as washington prepared for president obama's second inauguration. the bill would withhold members' pay if congress fails to pass a budget by april 15. they will hold an emergency meeting to discuss legislation tuesday setting up a vote as soon as wednesday on the house floor. angus is in rose dale, new york on our republican line. go ahead. caller: good evening. i'm sorry. it is agnes. first of all, i would like to thank c-span for giving us such excellent coverage as usual and yes, i am african-american and yes, i am a republican and my parents were republicans and we're from the south. i would like to say that -- a shout out to former president george bush and his family. i love them as well. i hope his family, his father -- they are in our prayers. i saw condoleezza rice today and she was beautiful as usual. i also would like to say that i have been in a dilemma of my party because i don't feel the leadership when the go
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 2:00am EST
entitlement issues. icy it the opposite way. let's get this done, the sequestration part and debt ceiling in the next six weeks and then move on.
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